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  1. Family: Elaeocarpaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Elaeocarpus Burm. ex L.
      1. Elaeocarpus fulvus Elmer

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Philippines (Mindanao).

    [KBu]

    Coode, M.J.E. 2010. laeocarpus for Flora Malesiana: new taxa and understanding in the Ganitrus group. Kew Bulletin 65: 355. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-010-9223-2

    Type
    Type: Philippines, Mindanao, Mt Apo, Elmer 10825 (holotype PNH†; isotypes BISH, G, K!, L! U).
    Habit
    Trees 18 m high
    Twigs
    Twigs densely ± tomentose, 1.5 – 2 mm thick towards the tip
    Stipules
    Stipules caducous, not seen
    Leaves
    Leaves with petioles 1 – 1.5 cm long, 1.5 – 2 mm wide, floccose-hairy, most of the indumentum lost before leaf-fall, rounded or flat in apical third above; blades papery to chartaceous, mostly oblong, some elliptic-oblong, a few elliptic, 2.5 – 3.2 × as long as wide, 8 – 10.5 × 2.5 – 4 cm, usually not acuminate, acute to obtuse at apex (60 – 90°), cuneate at base, young leaves densely floccose-hairy, glabrous beneath when mature or with some residual indumentum on midrib, with 9 – 12 pairs of main veins, fine venation network obscure above, midrib prominent beneath, main veins less so and breaking up ¾ – ⅞ inside margin, domatia absent beneath, margins weakly serrate, teeth 1 – 3 mm apart
    Inflorescences
    Racemes among the leaves or behind them but condensed towards twig tips, 3 – 5 cm long, the axis densely ± tomentose, 10 – 16-flowered; bracts early caducous, not seen; pedicels 8 – 11 mm long in flower; buds ovoid, acute at apex
    Calyx
    Sepals 3 – 4 × 1.2 – 1.8 mm, rather thin, sparsely hairy outside, glabrous inside
    Corolla
    Petals narrow-obovate to oblong, generally ± narrowed in lower third, 6 mm long, 2.1 – 2.3 mm wide at widest point of undivided part, divided into 12 – 13 apical divisions 2 – 2.5 mm long unequal in length and grouped into lobes (the degree of lobing very irregular, usually deep), petals glabrous outside except for a few hairs in a ± median band in lower ½ - ⅔ outside, glabrous inside or occasionally a few straight hairs present in middle)
    Receptacle
    Disk pulviniform, scarcely grooved, 0.5 mm high, velvety
    Stamens
    Stamens 26 – 28; filaments 0.2 – 0.5 mm long, not tapering but dorsi-ventrally flattened towards tip; anthers 2 – 2.7 mm long, with outer tooth slightly longer than inner, with a minute beak 0.2 – 0.3 mm long, acute, without setae at tip
    Ovary
    Ovaries 5-locular probably (from one unclear count and from Weibel’s mss description); ovules 4 per loculus; style 2.5 – 3 mm long
    Fruits
    Fruit unknown.
    Distribution
    Distribution. Philippines.
    Conservation
    Conservation Status. Data Deficient (DD). Since I have seen no recent collections this species may be to some degree endangered.
    Note
    Notes. Known from the type only. Elmer compared it to Elaeocarpus cumingii and other species in ‘sect. Elaeocarpus’; however, the ovary has 4 ovules per loculus and probably 5-locular ovaries; besides, the disk is something between pulviniform and an unlobed ring, whereas ‘sect. Elaeocarpus’ has a well-developed disk with fused or free lobes. Elmer’s collection also has leaves with fine even serrations and a base that is decurrent into a short petiole. This combination of characters fits much better with the Ganitrus group. It differs from most members of Ganitrus in having some inflorescences among the leaves, though most were reported by Elmer to be behind them, and in having floccose-hairy young parts, the hairs being crimped and interlocking. Apart from the quality of the indumentum, it is most similar to E. ramiflorus: domatia are missing from E. fulvus, which also has fewer flowers (10 – 16 not 15 – 25) and longer pedicels (8 – 11 mm not 4 – 7 mm), which are hardly striking distinctions.

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Philippines

    Other Data

    Elaeocarpus fulvus Elmer appears in other Kew resources:

    Bibliography

    First published in Leafl. Philipp. Bot. 4: 1179 (1911)

    Accepted by

    • Govaerts, R. (2001). World Checklist of Seed Plants Database in ACCESS E-F: 1-50919.

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin

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    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0