1. Family: Orchidaceae Juss.
    1. Acrolophia Pfitzer

      1. This genus is accepted, and its native range is SW. Cape Prov. to KwaZulu-Natal.

    [E-EM]
    Distribution

    Acrolophia, a genus of seven species, is entirely confined to South Africa. Previously cited as the only non-South African species, Acrolophia paniculata Cribb (Cribb 1977) is now placed in the genus Eulophia (as E. callichroma; Cribb 1989). Most species occur between Port Elizabeth (Eastern Cape) and Saldanha (Western Cape). Thus, Acrolophia is the only genus of Epidendroideae that is centred in the Cape. (HK, PL).

    Ecology

    Acrolophia species grow in fynbos or among bushes farther north. Flowering is enhanced by fire, and one species, A. ustulata Schltr. & Bolus, appears to be entirely fire-dependent. There is evidence that peak fl owering in this species is in the second year after fire. Acrolophia ustulata is unusual in the genus because it occurs in two colour forms (yellow–green and maroon). Plants of this genus usually grow scattered or in small clumps, but A. ustulata has been recorded in extensive colonies after burning. (HK, PL).

    General Description

    Glabrous, terrestrial herbs, normally evergreen, with rhizomes and fasciculate roots. Stem leafy, erect. Leaves cauline but clustered in lower portion of stem, distichous and fan-like, conduplicate, linear to narrowly lanceolate, coriaceous. Inflorescence terminal; bracts chartaceous. Flowers resupinate or not, reddish brown, white or green; pedicels longer than ovaries. Sepals spreading, lorate to lanceolate. Petals similar but shorter and wider, normally bent over column. Labellum shallowly trilobed, mostly spurred, midlobe spreading, sometimes curved and apically refl exed, with crenulate margin and papillae on disc, lateral lobes free. Column with a foot; anther incumbent; pollinarium with two hard, waxy pollinia, a single stipe, and viscidium; stigma in a cavity under beak-like rostellum. (HK, PL).

    [E-EM]
    Use

    There are no known uses of Acrolophia, and it is not common in cultivation. (AP).

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Cape Provinces, KwaZulu-Natal

    Acrolophia Pfitzer appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Entwurf. Anordn. Orch.: 59 (1887)

    Accepted by

    • Pridgeon, A.M., Cribb, P.J., Chase, M.C. & Rasmussen, F.N. (2009). Epidendroideae (Part two) Genera Orchidacearum 5: 1-585. Oxford University Press, New York, Oxford.
    • Govaerts, R. (2003). World Checklist of Monocotyledons Database in ACCESS: 1-71827. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Govaerts, R. (1995). World Checklist of Seed Plants 1(1, 2): 1-483, 1-529. MIM, Deurne.

    Literature

    Eulophiinae: e-monocot.org
    • Pridgeon, A.M., Cribb, P.J., Chase, M.W. & Rasmussen, F. Genera Orchidacearum, Volume 5: Epidendroideae (Part 2). Genera Orchidacearum 5, 584 (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2009).
    • Pfitzer, E.H.H. Original description of Acrolophia. 2(6), (1930).

    Sources

    Eulophiinae: e-monocot.org
    All Rights Reserved

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0