1. Family: Cucurbitaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Citrullus Schrad. ex Eckl. & Zeyh.
      1. Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai

        Watermelon is a member of the cucurbit family (Cucurbitaceae), which includes cucumbers ( Cucumis sativus), melons ( Cucumis melo, for example), loofahs ( Luffa species), and pumpkins and squashes ( Cucurbita species). The generic name  Citrullus is the diminutive of  Citrus, perhaps referring to the spherical fruit. The specific epithet  lanatus (meaning woolly) refers to dense woolly hairs on young parts of the plants, particularly stems.

    [KSP]

    Kew Species Profiles

    General Description
    Watermelon has long been valued for its refreshing fruits, which have also been used as an ingredient in cosmetics.

    Watermelon is a member of the cucurbit family (Cucurbitaceae), which includes cucumbers ( Cucumis sativus), melons ( Cucumis melo, for example), loofahs ( Luffa species), and pumpkins and squashes ( Cucurbita species). The generic name  Citrullus is the diminutive of  Citrus, perhaps referring to the spherical fruit. The specific epithet  lanatus (meaning woolly) refers to dense woolly hairs on young parts of the plants, particularly stems.

    Citrullus lanatus is widely cultivated for its edible fruits, which are also an important source of water in arid regions of Africa. It is thought that watermelon was first domesticated in central and southern Africa. Watermelon seeds and leaves have been found in ancient Egyptian tombs, suggesting it was cultivated there more than 5,000 years ago. Having been cultivated for so long, its origins are unknown, but it is thought that it may have been selected from Citrullus colocynthis (known as ‘bitter colocynth’; a bitter, poisonous perennial) in early African agriculture.

    Wild, unselected forms tend to bear bitter fruit, due to the presence of cucurbitacin (a biochemical compound used for defence against herbivores) and hence are normally only fed to cattle.

    Species Profile

    Geography and distribution

    Citrullus lanatus is thought to be native to Africa. It is found in grassland and bushland, mostly on sandy soils, and often along watercourses or near water, up to 1,785 m above sea level. It flourishes in dry climates and requires only limited rainfall.

    Some propose the Kalahari region (Botswana, Namibia and South Africa) as the area of origin, whereas others suggest it is native to northeastern Africa. Citrullus colocynthis, thought by some to be the wild parent, is found in dry areas of North Africa and Asia (eastwards to Afghanistan and Pakistan).

    Another closely related Namibian species, C. ecirrhosus, is thought more likely to be the progenitor based on studies of plastid DNA. In the wild in Africa, both sweet and bitter forms exist, and they quickly escape from sites of cultivation everywhere into neglected or abandoned farmlands, where they continue to be harvested.

    Watermelon is cultivated in all tropical and subtropical countries, as well as in temperate countries with a continental climate. It is widely naturalised.

    Description

    Overview:An annual climbing or trailing herb, with hairy stem up to 10 m long. Tendrils divided at the tip into two or three parts. Separate male and female flowers are borne on the same plant.

    Leaves: Leaf blades up to about 20 × 20 cm, more or less hairy, usually deeply 3–5-lobed, the central lobe being the largest. The lobes themselves are further divided. Leaf stalks (petioles) up to about 19 cm long, more or less hairy.

    Flowers: Solitary, borne in leaf axils. Both male and female flowers are yellow, up to 3 cm in diameter, and borne on pedicels (flower stalks) up to 45 mm long. Flowers are usually pollinated by honey bees.

    Fruits: Fruits of wild plants up to about 20 cm in diameter, greenish mottled with darker green. Fruits of cultivated plants up to about 70 × 30 cm, rounded, oval or oblong, with a golden-yellow to dark green skin, the skin being uniform, mottled or striped. Flesh usually red or yellow, sometimes orange, pink or white.

    Seeds: Flat, smooth, variable in size and colour (white, tan, brown, black, red, green or mottled).

    Uses

    Fruits – food and drink

    Watermelons are cultivated commercially for their refreshing, sweet fruits. Dry conditions are considered to produce the sweetest fruit (high humidity is thought to suppress formation of sugars).

    They are mostly consumed as fresh fruit, alone or as part of fruit salads or other desserts. In some African cuisines the fruit and leaves are cooked as a vegetable.

    Small, white-fleshed cultivars are used in the production of preserves. Watermelon fruits are made into syrup in Eastern Europe. The rind may be consumed in pickled or candied form. In parts of the former Soviet Union, and elsewhere, watermelon juice is fermented to produce an alcoholic beverage.

    Watermelons are collected from the wild for local use, notably as a source of water in the Kalahari region of southern Africa. The flesh comprises about 65% of the whole fruit and contains over 90% water. Watermelon contains carotenes and vitamin C.

    Seeds – food, oil, masticatory

    Watermelon seeds are used in some traditional African cuisines. They are eaten dry or roasted as a snack food or as an ingredient in soups, in the Middle East, China and other Asian countries. Watermelon seeds are rich in edible oils and protein. They are ground into flour and baked as bread in some parts of India.

    Watermelon seeds are sold in West African markets as egusi (a name also used for Cucumeropsis mannii, another member of the cucurbit family). They are chiefly used as a masticatory, but also for medicine, food and oil. They are roasted and ground to a pulp, which is added to soup or made into sauce or porridge. Seed oil is extracted for use in cooking.

    Seeds can be roasted and used as a coffee-substitute.

    Traditional medicine

    Watermelon fruit pulp, juice and seeds have been used as a diuretic. Fruit pulp has been used as a purgative, particularly that from bitter-forms.

    A preparation of watermelon seed has been used to lower blood pressure. Watermelon seeds have been used to expel intestinal worms in Senegal.

    Other uses

    Bitter forms of watermelon and the cake left over after expressing the seed oil are used as cattle-feed. The leaves and fruit provide grazing for stock.

    Watermelon has been used as an ingredient in sun-lotions and other cosmetics.

    Role of watermelons in American popular culture

    Although watermelon is native to Africa and did not reach the Americas until the 16th century, it rapidly gained favour and assumed an important role in American popular culture.

    Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States, was an enthusiastic grower of watermelons. American author and humorist Mark Twain wrote in Puddn’head Wilson:

    The true southern watermelon is a boon apart and not to be mentioned with commoner things. It is chief of this world’s luxuries, king by the grace of God over all the fruits of the earth. When one has tasted it, he knows what the angels eat.

    Mark Twain

    The true southern watermelon is a boon apart and not to be mentioned with commoner things. It is chief of this world’s luxuries, king by the grace of God over all the fruits of the earth. When one has tasted it, he knows what the angels eat.

    Watermelons feature prominently in art, literature, advertising and merchandising, and summer watermelon festivals are held throughout the USA.

    Millennium Seed Bank: Seed storage

    TheMillennium Seed Bank Partnership aims to save plant life worldwide, focusing on plants under threat and those of most use in the future. Seeds are dried, packaged and stored at a sub-zero temperature in our seed bank vault.

    Thirteen collections of Citrullus lanatus seeds are held in Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank based at Wakehurst in West Sussex.

    See Kew’s Seed Information Database for further information on Citrullus lanatusseeds.

    This species at Kew

    Watermelon is grown in Kew’s behind-the-scenes Tropical Nursery.

    Dried and spirit-preserved specimens of Citrullus lanatus are held in Kew’s Herbarium where they are available to researchers by appointment. The details of some of these specimens can be seen online in Kew’s Herbarium Catalogue.

    Specimens of watermelon fruits, seeds and oil are held in Kew’s Economic Botany Collection in the Sir Joseph Banks Building, where they are available to researchers by appointment.

    Kew’s Useful Plants Project in Botswana

    Kew’s Useful Plants Project in Botswana aims to help conserve plant species that are most beneficial to the wellbeing of local people.

    One particularly useful species is watermelon, Citrullus lanatus. An important source of water in the Kalahari region over the dry season, it also provides food and medicines.

    Working with inhabitants of Tsetseng and Lerala, the project team has agreed which plants are to be propagated in the community gardens. In both communities, facilities have been put in place for training growers and for propagating the useful species. In addition, a school programme has been developed to involve local children in the project.

    Distribution
    Botswana, Namibia, South Africa
    Ecology
    Grassland and bushland, often along watercourses.
    Conservation
    Least Concern in South Africa according to IUCN Red List criteria; widespread in cultivation.
    Hazards

    Some people experience an allergic reaction on ingestion of watermelon, including swelling of the mouth and throat.

    [FZ]

    Cucurbitaceae, C. Jeffrey. Flora Zambesiaca 4. 1978

    Habit
    Annual herb.
    Stem
    Stems prostrate or scandent to 10 m., ± villous, glabrescent.
    Tendrils
    Tendrils 2–3-fid.
    Leaves
    Leaf-lamina 5–20 × 3·5–19 cm., ovate or narrowly ovate in outline, cordate, ± hairy (especially on the veins beneath), becoming scabrid-punctate, usually deeply palmately 3–5-lobed, the lobes elliptic in outline, shallowly to usually deeply ± pinnately lobulate, subentire or obscurely sinuate-denticulate, rounded to subacute, apiculate, the central much the largest.
    Petiole
    Petioles 2–18·5 cm. long, ± hairy or villous, sometimes scabrescent.
    Probract
    Probracts 4–18 mm. long, obovate-spathulate.
    Flowers
    male flowers on ± villous 12–45 mm. long pedicels; receptacle-tube 2.5–5 mm. long, pale green, lobes 2·5–5 mm. long, lanceolate. Petals 0·7–1·9 × 0·4–1·4 cm., obovate, rounded, apiculate. Female flowers on 3–45 mm. long pedicels; ovary 6–15 × 4–8 mm., ellipsoid or subglobose, villous; receptacle-tube 1·5–2 mm. long, lobes 2·5–5·5 mm. long; corolla as in male flowers.
    Male
    male flowers on ± villous 12–45 mm. long pedicels; receptacle-tube 2.5–5 mm. long, pale green, lobes 2·5–5 mm. long, lanceolate. Petals 0·7–1·9 × 0·4–1·4 cm., obovate, rounded, apiculate.
    Female
    Female flowers on 3–45 mm. long pedicels; ovary 6–15 × 4–8 mm., ellipsoid or subglobose, villous; receptacle-tube 1·5–2 mm. long, lobes 2·5–5·5 mm. long; corolla as in male flowers.
    Fruits
    Fruit of wild plants 1·5–20 cm. in diameter, subglobose, greenish mottled with darker green, of cultivated plants up to 60 × 30 cm., subglobose or ellipsoid, green or yellowish, concolorous or variously mottled or striped; fruit-stalk 2–5 cm. long.
    Seeds
    Seeds c. 9–11 × 5–6 × 2·5–2·7 mm., ovate-elliptic in outline, smooth or slightly verrucose, dark or pale coloured, often mottled, sometimes bordered.
    [UPPd]
    Unspecified Medicinal Disorders
    Chopped plant added to the bath of the sick children, occasionally making the children to drink a little. The treatment is believed effective for many illnesses. Entire plant - Field guide to the plants of Northern Botswana including the Okavango delta
    Infections & Infestations
    En Puebla, se recomienda para tratar el paludismo. Unspecified plant parts - Biblioteca digital de la medicina tradicional mexicana.
    Endocrine System Disorders
    En Sonora se usa para tratar afecciones renales. Unspecified plant parts - Biblioteca digital de la medicina tradicional mexicana.
    Digestive System Disorders
    En Sonora se usa para tratar el estreñimiento. Unspecified plant parts - Biblioteca digital de la medicina tradicional mexicana.
    Muscular-Skeletal System Disorders
    En Sonora se usa para tratar el reumatismo. Unspecified plant parts - Biblioteca digital de la medicina tradicional mexicana. En Sonora se usa para tratar la gota. Unspecified plant parts - Biblioteca digital de la medicina tradicional mexicana.
    Genitourinary System Disorders
    En Sonora se usa para tratar transtornos de las vias urinarias. Unspecified plant parts - Biblioteca digital de la medicina tradicional mexicana.
    Sacred Spiritual Plants
    To win a court case. Chew a small piece of root and swallow a little juice, then, holding the big toe of the left foot with the left hand, make a cross on the sole of the foot using the right hand and, while holding the plant, speak in the heart about wis

    Images

    Distribution

    Found In:

    Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Provinces, Central African Repu, Chad, Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Free State, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Gulf of Guinea Is., Ivory Coast, Kenya, KwaZulu-Natal, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Northern Provinces, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zaïre, Zimbabwe

    Introduced Into:

    Alabama, Albania, Andaman Is., Ascension, Assam, Austria, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Brazil West-Central, Cayman Is., China North-Central, China Southeast, Colombia, Cook Is., Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Aegean Is., Gilbert Is., Hainan, Haiti, Illinois, India, Inner Mongolia, Korea, Leeward Is., Libya, Manchuria, Mauritius, Mexico Southwest, Nauru, Nepal, New Caledonia, New Mexico, New Zealand North, New Zealand South, Nicaragua, Nicobar Is., Niue, Pakistan, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qinghai, Rodrigues, Réunion, Samoa, Society Is., Socotra, Tibet, Trinidad-Tobago, Venezuela, Venezuelan Antilles, Windward Is., Xinjiang

    Common Names

    English
    Bitter apple, Bittermelon, Citron, Citron melon, Edible seed melon, Keme, Monkey apple, Tsama melon, Tsamma, Watermelon, Wild watermelon

    Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Identified Reference Herbarium Specimen Type Status
    Jan 1, 2014 Renner, S.S. [2816], Missouri K000543558 isotype
    May 1, 2007 Kgendwe, T. [926], Botswana K000731885
    Jan 1, 1983 Fay, J.M [5251], Central African Republic K000731869
    Jan 1, 1983 Fay, J.M [5252], Central African Republic K000731870
    Jan 1, 1983 Fay, J.M [5253], Central African Republic K000731871
    Jun 1, 1982 Reekmans, M. [11134], Burundi K000731872
    Jan 1, 1952 Hagerup, O. [133], Mali K000386755
    Kummrow, R. [1254], Brazil K001139696
    Pickersgill, B. [162], Brazil K001139697
    Philcox, D. [3280], Brazil K001139698
    Traill, J.W.H. [364], Brazil K001139699
    Maas, P.J.M. [322/B], Brazil K001139700
    Maas, P.J.M. [481], Brazil K001139701
    Traill, J.W.H. [364], Brazil K001139702
    Balée, W.L. [803], Brazil K001139703
    Hatschbach, G. [65075], Brazil K001139704
    Glaziou [10852], Brazil K001139705
    Glaziou [10853], Brazil K001139706
    Silva, L.A.M. [731], Brazil K001139707
    Garui, A.V. [3], Niger K000731865
    Terry, J. [128], Botswana K000731886
    Terry, J. [91], Botswana K000731887
    Skarpe, C. [S271], Botswana K000731888
    Skarpe, C. [S247], Botswana K000731891
    Hepper, F.N. [3788], Mali K000211804
    Niger 29047.635

    First published in Index Seminum (TI, Tokyo) 1915-1916: 30 (1916)

    Accepted in:

    • [3] (2014) Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany 38: 563-619
    • [4] Chang, C.S., Kim, H. & Chang, K.S. (2014) Provisional checklist of vascular plants for the Korea peninsula flora (KPF) . DESIGNPOST.
    • [7] (2013) PhytoKeys 20: 53-118
    • [8] (2013) Willdenowia 43: 165-184
    • [10] (2012) Nelumbo 54: 39-91
    • [13] (2012) Stapfia 97: 53-136
    • [14] Garcia-Mendoza, A.J. & Meave, J.A. (eds.) (2012) Diversidad florística de Oaxaca: de musgos a angiospermas (colecciones y listas de especies) , ed. 2: 1-351. Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
    • [15] (2011) Index synonymique de la flore d'Afrique du nord 3: 1-449. Éditions des conservatoire et jardin botaniques, Genève.
    • [17] Idárraga-Piedrahita, A., Ortiz, R.D.C., Callejas Posada, R. & Merello, M. (eds.) (2011) Flora de Antioquia: Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares 2: 1-939. Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín.
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    • [21] Onana, J.M. (2011) The vascular plants of Cameroon a taxonomic checklist with IUCN assessments . National herbarium of Cameroon, Yaoundé.
    • [23] (2010) Taxonomania 30: 1-307
    • [24] (2009) Scripta Botanica Belgica 41: 1-517
    • [25] (2009) Willdenowia 39: 165-177
    • [30] (2008) Sandakania 17: 43-91
    • [33] Akoègninou, A., van der Burg, W.J. & van der Maesen, L.J.G. (eds.) (2006) Flore Analytique du Bénin . Backhuys Publishers.
    • [34] Sita, P. & Moutsambote, J.-M. (2005) Catalogue des plantes vasculaires du Congo , ed. sept. 2005: 1-158. ORSTOM, Centre de Brazzaville.
    • [36] Miller, A.G. & Morris, M. (2004) Ethnoflora of Soqotra Archipelago . The Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh.
    • [40] Govaerts, R. (1999) World Checklist of Seed Plants 3(1, 2a & 2b): 1-1532. MIM, Deurne.
    • [43] (1994) Atoll Research Bulletin 392: 1-223
    • [45] MacKee, H.S. (1994) Catalogue des plantes introduites et cultivées en Nouvelle-Calédonie , ed. 2: 1-164. Museum national d'histoire naturelle, Paris.
    • [46] Thulin, M. (ed.) (1993) Flora of Somalia 1: 1-493. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • [47] Lebrun, J.p., Toutain, B., Gaston, A. & Boudet, G. (1991) Catalogue des Plantes Vasculaires du Burkina Faso . Institut d' Elevage et de Médecine Vétérinaire des Pays Tropicaux, Maisons Alfort.
    • [53] Boulvert, Y. (1977) Catalogue de la Flore de Centrafrique 2(1): 1-85. ORSTROM, Bangui.
    • [54] Peyre de Fabregues, B. & Lebrun, J.-P. (1976) Catalogue des Plantes Vascularies du Niger . Institut d' Elevage et de Médecine Vétérinaire des Pays Tropicaux, Maisons Alfort.
    • [56] (1975) Flore d'Afrique Centrale (Zaire-rwanda-Burundi) , Cucurbitaceae: 1-152. Jardin Botanique National de Belgique.
    • [58] (1973) Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Botany 4: 325-411
    • [59] Lebrun, J.-P., Audru, J., Gaston, A. & Mosnier, M. (1972) Catalogue des Plantes Vasculaires du Tchad Méridional . Institut d' Elevage et de Médecine Vétérinaire des Pays Tropicaux, Maisons Alfort.
    • [61] (1970) Bulletin, New Zealand Department of Scientific and Industrial Research 200: 1-321

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    Flora Zambesiaca
    [A] http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    International Plant Names Index
    The International Plant Names Index (2016). Published on the Internet http://www.ipni.org
    [B] © Copyright 2016 International Plant Names Index. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Species Profiles
    Kew Species Profiles
    [C] http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
    [D]

    Project MGU – Useful Plants Project (UPP) database
    [E]

    World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
    World Checklist of Selected Plant Families(2016). Published on the Internet http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    [F] See http://kew.org/about-kew/website-information/legal-notices/index.htm You may use data on these Terms and Conditions and on further condition that: The data is not used for commercial purposes; You may copy and retain data solely for scholarly, educational or research purposes; You may not publish our data, except for small extracts provided for illustrative purposes and duly acknowledged; You acknowledge the source of the data by the words "With the permission of the Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew" in a position which is reasonably prominent in view of your use of the data; Any other use of data or any other content from this website may only be made with our prior written agreement. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
    [G] © Copyright 2016 International Plant Names Index and World Checkist of Selected Plant Families. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Plants and People Africa
    Roger and Alison Heath, Plants and People Africa http://www.plantsandpeopleafrica.com © Copyright Plants and People Africa. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
    [H]