1. Family: Phyllanthaceae Martinov
    1. Genus: Leptopus Decne.
      1. Leptopus robinsonii Airy Shaw

        This species is accepted, and its native range is SE. Vietnam.

    [KBu]

    Vorontsova, M.S. & Hoffmann, P. 2009. Revision of the genus Leptopus (Phyllanthaceae, Euphorbiaceae sensu lato). Kew Bulletin 64: 627. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-009-9155-x

    Type
    Vietnam, Nha-trang and vicinity, 11 – 26 March 1911, Robinson 1313 (holotype L!).
    Habit
    Monoecious erect shrub
    Twigs
    Twigs bilaterally flattened, glabrous to hirsute, reddish
    Stipules
    Stipules deltoid, basally not auriculate, apically acute, light brown to almost black, 2 – 4 × 0.5 – 1 mm, hirsute, margin entire, ciliate
    Petiole
    Petiole 2 – 7 × 0.7 – 1 mm, up to ⅒ of leaf blade length, hirsute
    Leaves
    Leaf blade ovate to obovate, basally acute to attenuate, apically acuminate, (3) 6 – 10 (11.5) × (1.2) 1.5 – 3.3 (3.5) cm, 2.5 – 3 times longer than wide, chartaceous, drying slightly discolorous dark red to dark brown green, glabrous to sparsely hirsute on both sides, margin glabrous to hirsute; midvein adaxially flat, abaxially prominent, secondary veins 4 – 5 pairs, adaxially flat, abaxially flat to prominent
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescences unisexual or bisexual, male inflorescence axis 0 – 0.1 (3) mm long
    Bracts
    Bracts as stipules
    Disc
    Disc bilobed for ⅘ – ⅚ of length, lobes apically truncate, 0.7 – 1 × 0.2 – 0.25 mm, ½ – ⅔ as long as sepals, ¾ as long as petals Disc bilobed for ½ – ¾ of length, 0.6 – 0.8 × 0.3 – 0.7 mm, apically rounded to truncate, erose or crenulate, up to ⅕ of sepal length
    Stamens
    Stamens 5, 2 – 2.5 mm long; filaments 1.8 – 2.4 mm long, hirsute; anthers c. 0.35 × 0.2 mm
    Pistillodes
    Pistillode trilobed for ½ of length, c. 1.2 mm long, ½ of stamen length, hirsute
    Flowers
    Female flowers 1 – 4 per fascicle, 3 – 5 × 5 – 8 mm, 3 – 4 times larger than males, rotate Male flowers 1 – 2 per fascicle, 1.5 – 2.5 × 2 – 3.5 mm
    Pedicel
    Pedicel 5 – 10 mm long, not articulate, hirsute Pedicel 0.5 – 1.5 × 0.2 – 0.25 mm, articulate just above base, hirsute Fruiting pedicel 11 – 22 mm long
    Calyx
    Sepals 5, ovate, apically acute to acuminate, 2 – 4 × 1 – 2.5 mm, 0 – 1-veined, hirsute on both sides, margin entire, hirsute, eglandular Sepals 5, obovate, apically acute, 1.8 – 2.5 × 0.8 – 1.5 mm, chartaceous, without veins, hirsute outside, hirsute inside, margin entire ciliate, eglandular Mature sepals accrescent, 4 – 6 × 2 – 3 mm
    Corolla
    Petals 5, linear to ovate, apically acute to truncate, 0.3 – 0.5 × 0.1 – 0.3 mm, slightly shorter than disc or extending slightly beyond disc, without veins, hirsute Petals 5, obovate, apically rounded, 1 – 1.5 × 0.2 – 0.35 mm, ⅔ of sepal length, chartaceous, without veins, hirsute on both sides, margin entire, hirsute
    Ovary
    Ovary 3-locular, densely hirsute; styles 3, 1 – 2 mm long, free, hirsute; stigmas dilated
    Fruits
    Fruit 3 – 4 × 4.5 – 6 mm, smooth to faintly reticulate, hirsute, drying red brown Columella widest at base, apically linear, 2 – 2.5 × c. 0.5 mm
    Seeds
    Seeds triquetrous, 2 – 2.5 × 1.5 – 1.8 × 1.5 – 1.8 mm, without appendages, transversely to irregularly ridged in the same seed, sometimes pitted, red brown
    Embryo
    Embryo with radicle c. ½ as long as cotyledons
    Distribution
    Vietnam: Khanh Hoa Province. Map 3.
    Ecology
    Not known.
    Conservation
    Endangered (EN B1a,b(iii)) (IUCN 2001). Extent of occurrence is below 5,000 km2 and only six collections from two localities are known. This species is threatened by the expansion of tourism and industry in the area.
    Note
    Closely affiliated with Leptopus australis, this Vietnamese endemic differs from it mainly in its male flowers which are inconspicuous on shorter wider pedicels and do not open as wide as those of L. australis, with stamens protruding above the calyx and hirsute petals and filaments. The plants are perennial, larger than L. australis and dry a reddish colour.

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Vietnam

    Leptopus robinsonii Airy Shaw appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Aug 1, 2007 Robinson, C.B. [1305], Vietnam K000186403 paratype
    Aug 1, 2007 Poilane, E. [2727], Vietnam K000186404 paratype

    First published in Kew Bull. 25: 495 (1971)

    Accepted by

    • Vorontsova, M.S. & Hoffmann, P. (2010). Revision of the genus Leptopus (Phyllanthaceae, Euphorbiaceae sensu lato) Kew Bulletin 64: 627-644.

    Not accepted by

    • Govaerts, R., Frodin, D.G. & Radcliffe-Smith, A. (2000). World Checklist and Bibliography of Euphorbiaceae (and Pandaceae) 1-4: 1-1622. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. [Cited as Andrachne robinsonii.]

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin
    • Vorontsova, M. S. & Hoffmann, P. (2008). A phylogenetic classification of tribe Poranthereae (Phyllanthaceae; Euphorbiaceae sensu lato). Kew Bull. 63: 41 – 59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • NHN online collections database. Nationaal Herbarium Nederland. Website http://www.nationaalherbarium.nl/virtual/home.htm. [Accessed 13 Aug. 2007].
    • Welzen, P. C. van & Chayamarit, K. (2007). Flora of Thailand. Volume 8, Part 2: Euphorbiaceae, Genera G – Z . Forest Herbarium, Bangkok.Google Scholar
    • ____, ____, Maurin, O. & Chase, M. W. (2007). Molecular phylogenetics of tribe Poranthereae (Phyllanthaceae; Euphorbiaceae sensu lato). Amer. J. Bot. 94: 2026 – 2040.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • Hoffmann, P., Kathriarachchi, H. & Wurdack, K. J. (2006). A phylogenetic classification of Phyllanthaceae (Malpighiales; Euphorbiaceae sensu lato). Kew Bull. 61: 37 – 53.Google Scholar
    • McNeill, J., Barrie, F. R., Burdet, H. M., Demoulin, V., Hawksworth, D. L., Marhold, K., Nicolson, D. H., Prado, J., Silva, P. C., Skog, J. E., Wiersema, J. H. & Turland, N. J. (2006). International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. Regnum Vegetabile 146. A. R. G. Gantner Verlag, Ruggell, Liechtenstein.Google Scholar
    • Kathriarachchi, H., Hoffmann, P., Samuel, R., Wurdack, K. J. & Chase, M. W. (2005). Molecular phylogenetics of Phyllanthaceae inferred from five genes (plastid atpB, matK, 3´ndhF, rbcL, nuclear PHYC). Molec. Phylogen. Evol. 36: 112 – 134. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • Sumathi, R., Karthigeyan, K., Jayanthi, J. & Diwakar, P. G. (2005 publ. 2006). Leptopus sanjappae (Euphorbiaceae), a new species from the Andaman Islands, India. Bull. Bot. Surv. India 47: 155 – 158.Google Scholar
    • IUCN (2001). IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria: Version 3.1. IUCN Species Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.Google Scholar
    • Radcliffe-Smith, A. (2001). Genera Euphorbiacearum. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
    • Govaerts, R., Frodin, D. G. & Radcliffe-Smith, A. (2000). World checklist and bibliography of Euphorbiaceae (with Pandaceae): vol. 1. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
    • Webster, G. L. (1994). Synopsis of the genera and suprageneric taxa of Euphorbiaceae. Ann. Missouri Bot. Gard. 81: 33 – 144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • Burns-Balogh, P. (1993). Prodromus herbarium A. P. De Candolle on microfiche. International Documentation Centre in collaboration with the Jardin Botanique Geneva. Geneva.Google Scholar
    • ____ (1991). A new genus of Euphorbiaceae and some new nomenclatural combination [sic] of the Asclepiadaceous plants. J. S. China Agric. Univ. 12 (3): 38 – 42.Google Scholar
    • Chen, X. X. (1988). A new species of Leptopus from Guangxi. Guihaia 8: 233 – 234.Google Scholar
    • ____ (1988). Materials for Chinese Phyllanthoideae. Acta Phytotax. Sin. 26: 58 – 65.Google Scholar
    • Lauener, L. A. (1983). Catalogue of the names published by Hector Léveillé: XVI. Notes Roy. Bot. Gard. Edinburgh 40: 475 – 505.Google Scholar
    • Li, P. T. (1983). A synopsis of the genus Leptopus Decne. (Euphorbiaceae) in China. Notes Roy. Bot. Gard. Edinburgh 40: 467 – 474.Google Scholar
    • Ho, S. B. (1981). Leptopus. In: Flora Tsinlingensis 1 (3): 168 – 169. Science Press, Beijing.Google Scholar
    • ____ (1971a publ. 1972). The Euphorbiaceae of Siam. Kew Bull. 26: 191 – 363Google Scholar
    • ____ (1971b). Notes on Malesian and other Asiatic Euphorbiaceae; CXXVI. A new Leptopus from Indochina. Kew Bull. 25: 495 – 496Google Scholar
    • ____ (1969). Notes on Malesian and other Asiatic Euphorbiaceae; C. A new Phyllanthoid genus from Siam. Kew Bull. 23: 40 – 42.Google Scholar
    • Airy Shaw, H. K. (1964). Notes on Malaysian and other Asiatic Euphorbiaceae; XLIX. On the identity of Thelypetalum Gagnep. Kew Bull. 19: 299 – 300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • ____ (1960). Incrementa ad monographiam generum Andrachne L. et Leptopus Decne. Bot. Mater. Gerb. Bot. Inst. Komarova Akad. Nauk S.S.S.R. 20: 251 – 274.Google Scholar
    • Merrill, E. D. & Chun, W. Y. (1940). Additions to our knowledge of the Hainan flora; III. Sunyatsenia 5: 1 – 200.Google Scholar
    • Pojarkova, A. I. (1940). K sistematike kavkazskikh i vostochno-sredizemnomorskikh predstavitelei roda Andrachne s. l. [On the systematics of the Caucasian and east Mediterranean representatives of the genus Andrachne s. l.] Bot. Zhurn. S.S.S.R. 25: 341 – 348.Google Scholar
    • Henderson, M. R. (1939). The flora of the limestone hills of the Malay Peninsula. J. Malayan Branch Roy. Asiat. Soc. 7: 13 – 87.Google Scholar
    • Rehder, A. (1937). Notes on the ligneous plants described by H. Léveillé from eastern Asia. J. Arnold Arbor. 18: 206 – 257.Google Scholar
    • ____ (1934). Primulaceae. In: A. Rehder, Notes on the ligneous plants described by Léveillé from Eastern Asia. J. Arnold Arbor. 15: 293 – 294.Google Scholar
    • ____ (1931). Andrachne. In: Symbolae sinicae 7 (2): 219 – 221. Julius Springer, Vienna.Google Scholar
    • Beille, L. (1927). Andrachne. In: H. Lecomte, Flore générale de L’Indo-Chine 5: 537 – 540. Masson et Cie, ParisGoogle Scholar
    • Gagnepain, F. (1924 publ. 1925). Quelques genres nouveaux d’Euphorbiacées. Bull. Soc. Bot. France 71: 864 – 879.Google Scholar
    • Ridley, H. N. (1923). New Euphorbiaceae from the Malay Peninsula. Bull. Misc. Inform., Kew 1923: 360 – 369.Google Scholar
    • ____ & Hoffmann, K. (1922). Euphorbiaceae-Phyllanthoideae-Phyllantheae. In: A. Engler (ed.), Das Pflanzenreich, Heft 81. Wilhelm Engelmann, Berlin. Google Scholar
    • Handel-Mazzetti, H. (1921). Plantae novae Sinensis, diagnosibus brevibus descriptae a Dre Henr. Handel-Mazzetti (13. Fortsetzung). Anz. Akad. Wiss. Wien, Math.-Naturwiss. Kl. 58: 177 – 181.Google Scholar
    • Dunn, S. T. (1920). Andrachne emicans. In: Decades Kewenses. Plantarum novarum in herbario horti regii conservatarum. Decas XCVIII. Bull. Misc. Inform., Kew 1920: 210.Google Scholar
    • Hutchinson, J. (1916). Andrachne. In: C. S. Sargent, Plantae wilsonianae 2: 516 – 519. The University Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
    • ____ (1913). Decades plantarum novarum. CXII – CXVIII. Repert. Spec. Nov. Regni Veg. 12: 181 – 191.Google Scholar
    • Léveillé, A. A. H. (1911). Decades plantarum novarum. LIV – LVIII. Repert. Spec. Nov. Regni Veg. 9: 321 – 330.Google Scholar
    • Pax, F. (1900). Flueggea capillipes. In: L. Diels, Die Flora von Central-China. Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 29: 427.Google Scholar
    • Kuntze, C. E. O. (1891). Euphorbiaceae. In: Revisio Generum Plantarum 2: 590 – 621. Arthur Felix, Leipzig.Google Scholar
    • Hooker, J. D. (1887a). The Flora of British India. Volume 5. L. Reeve & Co., London.Google Scholar
    • ____ (1887b). Andrachne fruticosa, Dcne. In: Hooker’s Icones Plantarum 18: Plate 1704. Williams & Norgate, London.Google Scholar
    • Boissier, P. E. (1879). Andrachne. In: Flora orientalis 4 (2): 1137 – 1139. Basel, Geneva.Google Scholar
    • Müller, J. (1866). Euphorbiaceae. In: A. P. De Candolle (ed.), Prodromus systematis naturalis regni vegetabilis 15 (2): 189 – 1286. Victor Masson, Paris.Google Scholar
    • Miquel, F. A. W. (1859). Andrachne. In: Flora van Nederlandsch Indië 1 (2): 365. C. G. van der Post, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
    • Baillon, H. E. (1858). Étude générale du groupe des Euphorbiacées. Victor Masson, Paris.Google Scholar
    • Zollinger, H. (1845). Observationes phytographicae. Natuur- Geneesk. Arch. Ned.-Indie 2: 1 – 19.Google Scholar
    • Decaisne, J. (1844). Leptopus. In: V. Jacquemont & J. Cambessedes, Voyage dans l’Inde 4: Plantae rariores, quas in India orientali collegit: 155 – 156, tab. 156. Firmin Didot Frères, Paris.Google Scholar
    • Bunge, A. A. (1833). Enumeratio plantarum, quas in China boreali collegit. St Petersburg, Russia. Preprint for Mém. Sav. Étr. Acad. Petersb. 2: 75 – 148.Google Scholar
    • Necker, N. J. (1790). Arachne. In: Elementa Botanica 2: 348 – 349. Apud Societatem Typographicam, Neuwied.Google Scholar
    • Linné, C. (1753). Andrachne. In: Species Plantarum 2: 1014. Impensis Laurentii Salvii, Stockholm, Sweden.Google Scholar

    Sources

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.
    Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0