1. Family: Amaranthaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Pandiaka Benth. & Hook.f.
      1. Pandiaka welwitschii (Schinz) Hiern

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Cameroon to South Sudan and Angola.

    [FTEA]

    Amaranthaceae, C.C. Townsend. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1985

    Habit
    Perennial herb, (15–)50–120 cm., taller forms much branched with the lower branches increasingly widely divaricate; stem and branches ± densely furnished with whitish to yellowish spreading to upwardly ascending hairs, quadrangular, the older parts ± glabrescent and terete.
    Leaves
    Leaves usually obovate and rounded-apiculate, sometimes elliptic and subacute, broadly tapering below, those of the main stem and branches 1.2–8 × 0.6–3.5 cm., moderately appressed pilose on both surfaces with hairs usually of varying lengths, darker green above and paler beneath.
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescences terminal on the stem and branches, sometimes ± clustered at the top of the stem by branch reduction, pinkish, conical when young but finally cylindrical, 3–10 × 1.25–1.5 cm., very dense, on a 0.5–4 cm. densely tomentose peduncle.
    Bracts
    Bracts lanceolate-ovate, 4–6 mm., membranous with an obscurely to distinctly green centre, ± densely pilose centrally, diminishing to glabrous at the margins, tapering to the short acute arista formed by the excurrent midrib.
    Bracteoles
    Bracteoles similar or slightly narrower, 3–5 mm., more densely pilose, longer (± 0.5–1 mm.) aristate.
    Flowers
    Flowers truncate at the base and indurate, attached to the inflorescence-axis by a white annular callus.
    Tepal
    Tepals narrowly lanceolate; outer 2 greenish and ± densely pilose centrally, 5–8 mm., with 3(–5) white nerves, the 1(–2) outer pairs much shorter than the midrib, which is excurrent in a short arista; inner 3 similar but slightly shorter and progressively somewhat narrower and less pilose, 3-nerved or the innermost occasionally with only the midrib showing; all usually slightly upwardly curving near the tip.
    Perianth
    Perianth and bracteoles falling together in fruit.
    Stamens
    Stamens 2.5–5 mm.; pseudostaminodes 1–1.5 mm., oblong to flabellate, fimbriate (or dentate only at the apex with the margins fimbriate); dorsal scale broader and fimbriate to subulate-dentate.
    Ovary
    Ovary obpyriform, ± 1.5 mm..
    Style
    Style slender, 2.75–4.25 mm.
    Fruits
    Capsule oblong-ovoid, ± 2 mm., the firm flat apex with a transverse crest on each side of the style.
    Seeds
    Seed oblong-ellipsoid, ± 1.75 mm., brown, shining.
    Habitat
    Deciduous woodland, grassland, rocky hillsides and riversides, on sandy soil; 1125–1820 m.
    Distribution
    T1 T4
    [FZ]

    Amaranthaceae, C. C. Townsend. Flora Zambesiaca 9:1. 1988

    Habit
    Perennial herb, (15) 50–120 cm., taller forms much-branched with the lower branches increasingly widely divaricate; stem and branches more or less densely furnished with whitish to yellowish spreading to upwardly ascending hairs, quadrangular, the older parts more or less glabrescent and terete.
    Leaves
    Leaves usually obovate and rounded-apiculate, sometimes elliptic and subacute, broadly tapering below, those of the main stem and branches 1.2–8 × 0.6–3.5 cm., moderately appressed-pilose on both surfaces with hairs usually of varying lengths, darker green above and paler beneath.
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescences terminal on the stem and branches, sometimes more or less clustered at the apex of the stem by branch reduction, pinkish, conical when young but finally cylindrical, 3–10 × 1.25–1.5 cm. long, very dense, on a 0.5–4 cm. densely tomentose peduncle.
    Bracts
    Bracts lanceolate-ovate, 4–6 mm. long, membranous with an obscurely to distinctly green centre, more or less densely pilose centrally, diminishing to glabrous at the margins, tapering to the short acute arista formed by the excurrent midrib.
    Bracteoles
    Bracteoles similar or slightly narrower, 3–5 mm. long, more densely pilose, more longly (c. 0.5–1 mm.) aristate.
    Flowers
    Flowers truncate at the base and indurate, attached to the inflorescence axis by a white, annular callus.
    Tepal
    Tepals narrowly lanceolate; outer 2 greenish and more or less densely pilose centrally, 5–8 mm. long, with 3 (5) white nerves, the 1 (2) outer pairs much shorter than the midrib, which is excurrent in a short arista; inner 3 similar but slightly shorter and progressively somewhat narrower and less pilose, 3-nerved or the inner most occasionally with only uhe midrib showing; all usually slightly upwardly curving near the tip.
    Perianth
    Perianth and bracteoles falling together in fruit.
    Stamens
    Stamens 2.5–5 mm.; pseudostaminodes 1–1.5 mm., oblong to flabellate, fimbriate (or dentate only at the apex with the margins fimbriate), dorsal scale broader and fimbriate to subulate-dentate.
    Pistil
    Ovary obpyriform, c. 1.5 mm.; style slender, 2.75–4.25 mm.
    Fruits
    Utricle oblong-ovoid, c. 2 mm., the firm, flat apex with a transverse crest on each side of the style; seed c. 1.75 mm., oblong-ellipsoid, brown, shining.

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Angola, Cameroon, Central African Repu, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Zambia, Zaïre

    Pandiaka welwitschii (Schinz) Hiern appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Apr 13, 1905 Welw. [6488], Angola K000243756
    Welw. [6487], Angola K000243755
    Luarre, P. [5213], Congo K000243739 isotype

    First published in Cat. Afr. Pl. 1: 894 (1900)

    Accepted by

    • Darbyshire, I., Kordofani, M., Farag, I., Candiga, R. & Pickering, H. (eds.) (2015). The Plants of Sudan and South Sudan: 1-400. Kew publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Figueiredo, E. & Smith, G.F. (2008). Plants of Angola Strelitzia 22: 1-279. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.
    • Launert, E. (ed.) (1988). Flora Zambesiaca 9(1): 1-179. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Townsend, C.C. (1985). Flora of Tropical East Africa, Amaranthaceae: 1-136.

    Literature

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    • Darbyshire, I., Kordofani, M., Farag, I., Candiga, R. & Pickering, H. (eds.) (2015). The Plants of Sudan and South Sudan: 1-400. Kew publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Figueiredo, E. & Smith, G.F. (2008). Plants of Angola Strelitzia 22: 1-279. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.
    • Troupin, G. (ed.) (1978). Flora du Rwanda 1: 1-413. Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale.
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    • Cavaco, in Mém. Mus. Nat. Hist. Nat. Paris, sér. B, 13: 141 (1962).
    • Peter, Flora von Deutsch-Ostafrika 2: 241 (1932).
    • J. G. Baker & C. B. Clarke in Flora of Tropical Africa 6(1): 69 (1909).
    • Hiern, Cat. Afr. Pl. Welw. 1: 894 (1900).

    Sources

    Flora Zambesiaca
    Flora Zambesiaca
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.
    Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0