1. Family: Rubiaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Kohautia Cham. & Schltdl.
      1. Kohautia caespitosa Schnizl.

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Tropical & S. Africa to Arabian Peninsula.

    [FZ]

    Rubiaceae, B. Verdcourt. Flora Zambesiaca 5:1. 1989

    Habit
    According to my recent investigations and revision of the genus, this somewhat variable species can be divided into 3 subspecies of which only 1 (subsp. brachyloba) occurs in the Flora Zambesiaca area. Subsp. caespitosa occurs in N.E. Africa (Sudan, N. Ethiopia, N. Somalia, Egypt), Sinai and the Arabian peninsula, whereas subsp. amaniensis is found in S. Somalia, S. Ethiopia, E. Uganda, Kenya and N. Tanzania.
    [FTEA]

    Rubiaceae, B. Verdcourt. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1976

    Habit
    Annual, perennial or sometimes subshrubby herb, usually erect, 10–90 cm. tall, branched at the base with several to many caespitose glabrous to densely scabridulous pubescent stems; rootstock containing a red dye.
    Leaves
    Leaves linear to linear-lanceolate or narrowly elliptic, 0.5–8 cm. long, 0.3–5(–12) mm. wide, acute to narrowly apiculate at the apex, narrowed to the base, glabrescent to densely scabridulous-pubescent or -papillose; stipular sheath 1–8 mm. long, produced into 2–5 filiform fimbriae 0.5–3 mm. long.
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescences often trichotomous or dichasial, the branches often again similarly branched, the flowers usually solitary at the nodes; peduncles 0–8 cm. long; pedicels almost obsolete or up to 1.1(–2.4) cm. long (though often in these cases the stalk is a reduced branchlet).
    Calyx
    Calyx-tube ovoid, ± 1 mm. long, verruculose, scabridulous or glabrous; lobes lanceolate to triangular, 0.5–2 mm. long, glabrous or with indistinctly scabridulous margins, the teeth often with secondary elements between and sometimes developed into quite distinct filaments.
    Flowers
    Flowers scented; corolla white, grey, buff, yellowish, pink or lilac, the tube often purplish and the lobes ochraceous, nearly always pale inside, glabrous or papillate outside; tube narrowly cylindrical, (0.8–)1.15–1.4 cm. long, the widened part 1.5–3 mm. long, 0.5(–1.5) mm. wide; lobes linear-oblong to narrowly elliptic, 2–6 mm. long, 0.6–1.2(–1.7) mm. wide.
    Style
    Style 1.5–4 mm. long, in one variety just touching the anthers.
    Fruits
    Capsule subglobose or ovoid, 1.5–4 mm. tall, 2–3(–5.5) mm. wide, verruculose, hispidulous or glabrous, the beak slightly raised at dehiscence.
    Seeds
    Seeds pale olive-brown, angular-subconic, ± 0.3 mm. long, reticulate.

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cape Provinces, Caprivi Strip, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Free State, Gulf States, Kenya, KwaZulu-Natal, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Northern Provinces, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Sinai, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zambia, Zaïre, Zimbabwe

    Kohautia caespitosa Schnizl. appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Flora 25(Beibl.): 145 (1842)

    Accepted by

    • Dobignard, A. & Chatelain, C. (2013). Index synonymique de la flore d'Afrique du nord 5: 1-451. Éditions des conservatoire et jardin botaniques, Genève.
    • Raffaelli, M., Mosti, S. & Tardelli, M. (2006). Boswellia sacra Flueck. (Burseraceae) in the Hasik area (Eastern Dhofar, Oman) and a list of surrounding flora Webbia; Raccolta de Scritti Botanici 61: 245-251.
    • Thulin, M. (ed.) (2006). Flora of Somalia 3: 1-626. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Govaerts, R. (2003). World Checklist of Selected Plant Families Database in ACCESS: 1-216203. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Boulos, L. (2000). Flora of Egypt 2: 1-352. Al Hadara Publishing, Cairo.

    Literature

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    • Raffaelli, M., Mosti, S. & Tardelli, M. (2006). Boswellia sacra Flueck. (Burseraceae) in the Hasik area (Eastern Dhofar, Oman) and a list of surrounding flora Webbia; Raccolta de Scritti Botanici 61: 245-251.
    • Thulin, M. (ed.) (2006). Flora of Somalia 3: 1-626. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Ruhsam, M in Ruhsam, M. (2005). Survey of all the Rubiaceae specimens at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Boulos, L. (2000). Flora of Egypt 2: 1-352. Al Hadara Publishing, Cairo.
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    • A.D.Q. Agnew, Upland Kenya Wild Flowers p. 398 (1974).
    • Bremek. in Verh. K. Nederl. Akad. Wet., Afd. Natuurk., ser. 2, 48 (2): 104 (1952).
    • Schnizl. in Flora 25, Beibl. 1: 145 (1842).

    Sources

    Flora Zambesiaca
    Flora Zambesiaca
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Plants and People Africa
    Common Names from Plants and People Africa http://www.plantsandpeopleafrica.com/
    © Plants and People Africa http://www.plantsandpeopleafrica.com http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/