1. Family: Myrtaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Eugenia P.Micheli ex L.
      1. Eugenia breviracemosa Mazine

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Brazil (Amazonas).

    [KBu]

    Mazine, F.F. & Souza, V.C. 2009. New species of Eugenia sect. Racemosae (Myrtaceae) from Brazilian Amazon Rainforest. Kew Bulletin 64: 147. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-008-9094-y

    Habit
    Shrub to treelet 1 – 1.5 m, branches glabrous to subglabrous
    Leaves
    Leaf blade elliptic-ovate, 5.3 – 7.3 cm long, 2.2 – 4 cm wide, subcoriaceous, glabrous to subglabrous on both surfaces, hairs simple, apex acute or obtuse, base rounded, midvein sulcate, glabrous to subglabrous on both surfaces, lateral veins indistinct, marginal vein 1 – 2 mm from the margin; glandular dots impressed or slightly prominent on the upper surface; petiole 4 – 6 mm long
    Inflorescences
    Raceme not corymbose, with 3 – 5 pairs of flowers, axillary, sessile or pedunculate, peduncle 5 – 7 mm long, rachis 1.3 – 3.2 cm long, glabrous to subglabrous; axis of the raceme shorter than the length of the leaf blade
    Flowers
    Flower bud 2 – 3 mm diam., floral bracts persistent, c- 1 mm long, pedicel 1 – 1.5 cm long, glabrous to subglabrous, bracteoles to 1 mm long, connate at the base, apex rounded, glabrous to subglabrous, margin ciliate, persistent, sepals 2.5 – 3 mm long, persistent, apex rounded, glabrous to subglabrous, margin ciliate; petals 4 – 5 mm long, oblong, apex obtuse or rounded; filaments c- 4 mm long, glabrous; hypanthium glabrous to subglabrous, not costate, style c- 6 mm long, subglabrous
    Fruits
    Fruit globose, 5 – 6 mm long, 6 – 9 mm diam, reddish, glabrous to subglabrous, surface not costate, with glands
    Distribution
    Known from the Rio Negro basin, Brazil.
    Ecology
    Occurring in dense flooded ombrophilous forest (“igapó”).
    Conservation
    IUCN category: Data deficient (DD).
    Note
    Eugenia breviracemosa is a species of glabrous or subglabrous plants, with leaf blades generally subcoriaceous, generally with a rounded base and indistinct lateral veins on the upper surface. Among other species of Eugenia found in Amazon forests, E. breviracemosa resembles E. longiracemosaKiaersk., also endemic to the Rio Negro basin and with pedunculate racemes, persistent floral bracts and a glabrous or subglabrous hypanthium. However, E. breviracemosa has racemes with the axis shorter than the leaf blade, in addition to the shorter peduncle of the inflorescence. The specific epithet refers to the short peduncle of the inflorescences of this species.

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Brazil North

    Eugenia breviracemosa Mazine appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Kew Bull. 64: 151 (2009)

    Accepted by

    • Govaerts, R.H.A. (2011). World checklist of selected plant families published update Facilitated by the Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin
    • Mazine, F. F. (2006). EstudosTaxonômicos e Filogenéticosem Eugenia L. (Myrtaceae), com ênfaseem Eugenia sect. Racemosae O. Berg. PhD thesis, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Merwe, M. M. van der, van Wyk, A. E. & Botha, A. M. (2005). Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Eugenia L. (Myrtaceae), with emphasis on southern African taxa. Pl. Syst. Evol. 251: 21 – 34. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • ____, Landrum, L. & Grifo, F. (2003). Myrtaceae. In: P. E. Berry, K. Yatskievych & B. Holst (eds.), Flora of the Venezuelan Guayana vol. 7: 1 – 99. Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis.Google Scholar
    • Holst, B. K. (2002). New Species and Notes on Myrtaceae from Northern South America. Selbyana 23(2): 137 – 180.Google Scholar
    • Sanchez-Vindas, P. E., Holst, B. K. & Pool, A. (2001). Myrtaceae. In: W. D. Stevens, C. Ulloa, A. Pool & O. M. Montiel (eds.), Flora de Nicaragua. Angiospermas: Fabaceae-Oxalidaceae. Monogr. Syst. Bot. Missouri Bot. Gard. 85 (2): 1564 – 1580.Google Scholar
    • Oliveira-Filho, A. T. & Fontes, M. A. L. (2000). Patterns of Floristic Differentiation among Atlantic Forests in Southeastern Brazil and the Influence of Climate. Biotropica 32 (4b): 793 – 810.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • ____. (1861). RevisioMyrtacearumAmericae. Linnaea. 31: 247 – 262.Google Scholar
    • ____. (1860). RevisioMyrtacearumAmericae. Linnaea. 30: 647 – 713.Google Scholar
    • ____ (1859). Myrtaceae. In: C. F. P. Martius. Flora Brasiliensis. 14 (1): 529 – 656.Google Scholar
    • ____. (1858a). RevisioMyrtacearumAmericae. Linnaea 29 (2, 3): 207 – 264Google Scholar
    • ____. (1858b). Myrtaceae. In: C. F. P. Martius. Flora Brasiliensis. 14 (1):469 – 528.Google Scholar
    • ____. (1857). Myrtaceae. In: C. F. P. Martius. Flora Brasiliensis. 14 (1): 1 – 468.Google Scholar
    • ____. (1856). RevisioMyrtacearumAmericae. Linnaea 27 (2, 3, 4): 129 – 472.Google Scholar
    • Berg, O. (1855). RevisioMyrtacearumAmericae. Linnaea 27 (1): 1 – 128.Google Scholar

    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0