1. Family: Asphodelaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Aloe L.
      1. Aloe benishangulana Sebsebe & Tesfaye

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Ethiopia.

    [KBu]

    Demissew, S., Friis, I., Awas, T. et al. Kew Bull (2011) 66: 111. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-011-9263-2

    Type
    Typus: Ethiopia, WG: Benishangul, near Assosa, 3 km from Amba “No. 11”, 10°11.08'N, 34°39.08'E, 20 Aug. 2000, Herrmann 157 (holotypus ETH! photo K!).
    Habit
    Acaulescent, spreading by vegetative offsets, growing in rock crevices or “rock shelters”; rosette emerging from rock crevices or from rock bottoms that partly shelter the lower parts of the plant; root system massive
    Leaves
    Leaves laxly rosulate, 20 – 46 × 1 – 4.5 cm; leaf surface dull green, smooth; marginal teeth 1 – 1.5 mm, white, 3 – 8 mm apart or 10 – 12 per 10 cm length; exudate drying yellow
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescence 50 – 60 cm long, simple; raceme cylindrical, c. 28 cm long, lax, with 1 flower/cm
    Flowers
    Flowers on both sides of the raceme
    Bracts
    Bracts ovate, 8 – 10 × c. 4 mm, acuminate at the apex
    Pedicel
    Pedicel 8 – 10 mm long
    Perianth
    Perianth bright scarlet, becoming paler to almost white towards mouth, 37 – 40 mm long, base truncate, c. 8 mm in diam.; outer tepals free for a length of 10 mm
    Fruits
    Capsule 25 – 27 mm long, each segment 25 – 27 × 10 mm.
    Ecology
    Bamboo (Oxythenanthera abyssinica) thicket with open rocky outcrops or partially covered by slanting rocks giving protection against fire; 1490 – 1500 m. This is the only species that occurs in the main Combretum-Terminalia woodland vegetation type in Ethiopia, where the species experiences natural and anthropogenic fire regimes, although another of the new species in this paper, Aloe ghibensis, occurs in one of the deep river gorges that represent penetration of the Combretum-Terminalia woodland into the Ethiopian Highlands. Aloe benishangulana is very well adapted to the prevailing fire regime, by having a deep, extensive root system and growing in rock crevices and sheltered parts of rocks (when the rocks are not firmly attached to the ground). With such adaptations, fire would be unlikely to destroy all the above-ground parts of the plant. Even if there is occasional large-scale, persistent fire in the area of occurrence, the well-developed root system would allow it to regenerate.
    Conservation
    Data Deficient (DD). The species may be widespread in Benishangul-Gumuz Regional State where habitats similar to those of the known collecting localities are quite common.
    Phenology
    Flowering April – August.
    Note
    The species resembles Aloe schweinfurthii Baker from Southern Sudan, N Uganda and N Zaire extending to West Africa (Ghana). It differs from A. schweinfurthii by the leaves lacking spots (spotted), weak whitish marginal spines 1 – 15 mm long (not pungent brownish marginal spines 3 – 5 mm long), bracts c. 10 × 4 mm (not 4 – 7 × 2 – 3 mm), pedicel 10 – 11 mm long (not c. 13 mm long) and capsule 25 – 27 mm long (not 17 – 20 mm long). The species epithet of Aloe benishangulana refers to the “Benishangul-Gumuz Region” from where the species is known.

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Ethiopia

    Aloe benishangulana Sebsebe & Tesfaye appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Kew Bull. 66: 113 (2011)

    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0