1. Family: Malvaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Sida L.
      1. Sida graniticola J.R.I.Wood

        This species is accepted, and its native range is E. Bolivia.

    [KBu]

    Wood, J.R.I. 2013. New records of Malvaceae from the Chiquitania of Eastern Bolivia. Kew Bulletin 68: 609. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-013-9472-y

    Habit
    Perennial herb, probably shortly-lived, 30 – 75 cm high; stems erect, somewhat woody below, usually much branched, pilose with scattered spreading, multicellular hairs c. 2 mm long mixed with a dense covering of short, stiff, often gland-tipped spreading hairs
    Leaves
    Leaves petiolate; stipules 0.75 mm, linear; petioles 0.8 – 2.5 cm long, pilose with a few long spreading hairs mixed with numerous short, stiff, spreading hairs, multicellular hairs; lamina 2 – 5 × 0.8 – 2.5 cm, apex acute, base cordate, margin dentate, adaxially green, shortly asperous-puberulent and slightly pustulate, abaxially paler, densely pubescent with somewhat asperous hairs
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescence formed of (1 –) 3 – 4 (– 5)-flowered cymes, terminal on the main branches and smaller axillary branchlets; bracts at branching points, resembling small leaves, 3 – 15 × 1.5 – 7 mm; flowers solitary, pedicellate, pedicels 1.5 – 2.5 cm long, articulated 4 – 5 mm below the flower, densely hirsute with short spreading, stiff hairs; calyx 4 – 5 mm long, 5-lobed, the lobes triangular, 1-veined, acute to shortly apiculate, becoming purplish, outside densely hirsute with scattered long spreading hairs and a dense covering of shorter stiff hairs; petals yellow, 6 – 7 mm long, scarcely exceeding the calyx, glabrous, staminal column 1 mm, glabrous, filaments 1 mm, styles 5, 3 mm long, whitish with a purple, capitate stigma
    Fruits
    Fruit 4 – 5 mm wide, mericarps 5, resembling small orange segments, 2 mm long, muticous. dorsal surface smooth, with a longitudinal central depression, margins muricate, hirsute with very short erect hairs, near glabrescent when mature, seeds 2 × 1.5 mm, ovoid, smooth, with a single vertical cleft
    Figures
    Figs 3C, 5.
    Distribution
    Endemic to the Chiquitano region of Eastern Bolivia where it is found in Ñuflo de Chávez and Velasco Provinces of Santa Cruz Department.
    Ecology
    Sidagraniticola is plant of shallow, well-drained soils in open cerrado or, most commonly in soil pockets on and around the granite domes, which are a feature of the region and from which the epithet graniticola is derived. It is recorded from around 300 to around 750 m. These granite domes often provide a habitat for unusual endemic species, which include ChamaecristachiquitanaBarneby, Ancistrotropissubhastata (Verdc.) A. Delgado, Thrasyacrucensis Killeen, and Borreriavelascoana E. L. Cabral, R. M. Salas & J. D. Soto as well as undescribed species of Pectis L. and Ipomoea L. currently being prepared for publication.
    Conservation
    Although no thorough study has been carried out, this species should be provisionally classified as Least Concern (LC). It occurs over at least 1200 km2 in extensive areas of Ñuflo de Chávez and Velasco provinces in Santa Cruz Department. Although not restricted to them, it is particularly characteristic of the granite domes, which are frequent in this region and resistant to habitat change. Experience suggests that once this species can be recognised it can be found after diligent search on or around most granite domes of the region.

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Bolivia

    Sida graniticola J.R.I.Wood appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Kew Bull. 68: 615 (2013)

    Accepted by

    • Jørgensen, P.M., Nee, M.H. & Beck., S.G. (eds.) (2013). Catálogo de las plantas vasculares de Bolivia Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 127: 1-1741. Missouri Botanical Garden.

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin
    • Villarroel, D. & Proença, C. E. B. (2013). A new species and new records of Myrtaceae from the Noel Kempff Mercado National Park region of Bolivia. Kew Bull. 68 (2) 261 – 267.Google Scholar
    • Cabral, E. L., Miguel, L. M. & Soto, J. D. (2012). Dos especiesnuevas de Borreria (Rubiaceae) y sinopsis de las especies de Bolivia. Brittonia 64: 394 – 412.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • Harley, R. M. (2012). New species of Hyptis (Lamiaceae) from Bolivia. Kew Bull. 67: 779 – 788.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • Salas, R. M., Soto, D. & Cabral, E. L. (2011). Dos especiesnuevas de Borreria (Rubiaceae), un nuevo registro de Declieuxia y observacionestaxonómicas. Brittonia 63: 286 – 294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Kew Backbone Distributions
    • Jørgensen, P.M., Nee, M.H. & Beck., S.G. (eds.) (2013). Catálogo de las plantas vasculares de Bolivia Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 127: 1-1741. Missouri Botanical Garden.

    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0