1. Family: Begoniaceae C.Agardh
    1. Genus: Begonia L.
      1. Begonia dolichobracteata Girm.

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Borneo (Kalimantan).

    [KBu]

    Girmansyah, D. & Susanti, R. 2015. Two new species of Begonia (Begoniaceae) from Borneo. Kew Bulletin 70: 19. DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-015-9569-6

    Type
    Type: Central Kalimantan, Km 87, Bukit Mentewang, PT Sari Bumi Kusuma (SBK) Katingan-Seruyan logging concession area, 1 July 2012, Deden 1744 (holotype BO!, isotype BO!).
    Habit
    Erect herb, up to 50 cm tall
    Stem
    Stem woody at base and fleshy through the apex, swollen at nodes, rooting at the nodes, internodes 1 – 10 cm apart, shorter nearer the apex, with dense hairs near to the apex of the stem, becoming glabrous with age near the base, reddish brown
    Stipules
    Stipules oval, with hairs at the dorsal side, with a hair-like appendage at the apex, 1 – 1.5 × 0.5 – 0.8 cm, caducous
    Leaves
    Leaves alternate, slightly oblique; petioles 0.4 – 0.5 cm long, sparsely hairy; lamina 10 – 17 × 5 – 10 cm, asymmetric, ovate-oblong, base unequal, cuneate at one side and rounded the other side, one side extending 5 – 6 mm further down the petiole than the other, broad side 3 – 6.5 cm wide, narrow side 2 – 3.5 cm wide, apex acute to acuminate, margin sinuate to dentate with minute hairs at the end of each tooth, upper surface dark green with scattered short hairs on the main vein and between the veins, underside reddish green to light red with scattered reddish hairs along the veins, venation pinnate, 3 – 4 pairs, two pairs nearest the base arising opposite, remaining pairs alternate
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescence protogynous, cymose, peduncle 2 – 5 cm long, male and female flower on the same inflorescences
    Bracts
    Bracts white to pink, persistent, elliptic, margin with glandular hairs, apex rounded, those associated with male and female flowers are rounded, imbricate, emarginated
    Flowers
    Female flowers pedicels 0.5 − 1 cm long; tepals 6, three large tepals, 0.6 – 0.8 × 0.7 – 0.9 cm, three small tepals, 0.2 – 0.3 × 0.5 cm; ovary capsule, white with reddish to light reddish along the middle, 0.7 – 0.8 × 0.3 – 0.4 cm without wings, ovoid, locules 3, placentation axile, placentae bifid; wings 3, equal, rounded at the apex, 2 – 11 mm wide, stigmas 3, style Y-shaped, 2.5 – 3 mm long Male flowers pedicels 0.5 cm long, pure white, glabrous; tepals 4, white with reddish along the margin, larger tepals 1 × 1 cm, rounded to obovate; smaller tepals 0.3 × 0.7 cm, androecium 3 mm diam., cluster globose, stamens c. 60, filaments c. 0.5 – 1 mm long, fused at the base, anthers c. 1 mm long, oblong, dehiscing through unilateral slits c. ½ as long as anther One or pair of female flowers basal and many male flowers distal
    Fruits
    Fruit pedicel pale green to red with short hairs, 0.8 – 1.2 cm long; capsule ovoid, plain with scattered hairs along the capsule,1.2 – 2.3 × 0.2 – 0.4 cm without wing, wing 3 subequal, 4 − 11 mm wide at the widest point, splitting between the locules and wings
    Seeds
    Seed ellipsoid, 0.34 – 0.36 mm long, collar cells more than a half of the seed length
    Note
    Related to Begonia imbricata Sands, differing in having white to reddish white bracts (vs pale green to yellowish green in B. imbricata); number of female tepals six (vs five), stipules widely to narrowly triangular shaped (vs broadly ovate to ovate–oblong), stipule size 1 – 1.5 × 0.5 – 0.8 cm (vs 1.9 – 3 × 1.2 – 1.6 cm) and single female flower (vs two per axil or in pairs). Begonia dolichobracteata is a distinctive species in its persistent bracts that are relatively large and white to reddish in colour, and the 3 narrow tepals alternating with 3 broad tepals on the female flower are also unusual within section Petermannia. This species is similar to B. imbricata from Sabah, but distinguished by having white bracts, six white female tepals, white to green ovary with a red line along the middle, and capsule ovoid, plain with scattered hairs along the capsule. Their habitats are also different; B. imbricata grows on river sides or banks at high altitude (1000 – 1100 m) whilst B. dolichobracteata is found on dryer soils on hill slopes lower than 500 m asl. The epithet is derived from the long bract that gives the inflorescence its beautiful appearance.
    Distribution
    Known from the type locality, PT Sari Bumi Kusuma Forest Concession area, Katingan Block, Central Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia. This species has a wider distribution compared to Begonia mentewangensis. As for the previous species, B. dolichobracteata can be found in wet areas near rivers, but also on forest floor with thick litter.
    Ecology
    Terrestrial herb, grows in substrate with thick litter, quite open areas up to closed canopy, along the trail and slope of the hill in tropical forest lower than 500 m asl.
    Conservation
    According to IUCN Red List criteria (IUCN 2001), the conservation status of Begonia dolichobracteata must be considered Data Deficient (DD) because it is known only from three collections. More extensive collections from the region are needed to confirm its distribution. Further explorations are necessary to ascertain the status of the species.

    Distribution

    Begonia dolichobracteata Girm. appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Kew Bull. 70(2)-19: 2 (2015)

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin
    • Julia, S., Kiew, R. & Geri, C. (2013). Revision of Begonia (Begoniaceae) from the Melinau Limestone in GunungMulu National Park and Gunung Buda National Park, Sarawak, Borneo, including thirteen new species. Phytotaxa 99(ser. 1): 1 – 34.Google Scholar
    • Kiew, R. & Julia, S. (2009). Seven new species of Begonia (Begoniaceae) from the Ulu Merirai and Bukit Sarang Limestone Areas in Sarawak, Borneo. Gard. Bull. Singapore 60 (2): 351 – 372Google Scholar
    • Hughes, M. (2008). An Annotated Checklist of South-East Sulawesi Asian Begonia. Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh.Google Scholar
    • Kiew, R. & Julia, S. (2007). Begonia (Begoniaceae) from Limestone Hills in the Kuching Division, Sarawak, Malaysia. Gard. Bull. Singapore 58 (2): 199 – 232.Google Scholar
    • Kiew, R. (2005). Begonia in Peninsular Malaya. Natural History Publications, Borneo.Google Scholar
    • IUCN (2001). IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria: Version 3.1. Prepared by IUCN Species Survival Commission, IUCN, Gland and Cambridge.Google Scholar
    • Doorenbos, J., Sosef, M. S. M. & De Wilde, J. J. F. E. (1998). The sections of Begonia including descriptions, keys and species lists (Studies in Begoniaceae VI). Wageningen Agr. Univ. Pap. 98(2): 1 – 266.Google Scholar

    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0