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  1. Family: Musaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Musa L.
      1. Musa sanguinea Hook.f.

        This species is accepted, and its native range is SE. Tibet to Assam.

    [KBu]

    Häkkinen, M. & Väre, H. 2009. Typification of Musa mannii, M. sanguinea and M. x kewensis (Musaceae). Kew Bulletin 64: 559. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-009-9145-z

    Type
    Icon in Curtis’s Bot. Mag. 98: t. 5975 (1872). (lectotype, designated here).
    Habit
    Plant slender, suckering freely, close to parent plant, 4 – 5 suckers, position vertical; mature pseudostem 1 – 1.2 m high and 4 – 5 cm in diam. at base, in appearance varying with amounts of dead brown sheaths, underlying colour light green with large black blotches, shiny, sap watery
    Petiole
    Petiole 30 – 40 cm long, brown, petiole canal open with margins spreading, petiole bases heavily corrugated and not clasping the pseudostem with sparse black blotches
    Leaves
    Leaf habit erect, lamina 75 – 85 × 25 – 30 cm, oblong, truncate at the apex, colour of upper surface bright green and lower surface medium green, corrugated, appearance shiny, no wax on either surface, leaf bases asymmetric, both sides rounded, midrib dorsally medium green and ventrally purple, with corrugated lamina
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescence erect, peduncle 10 – 12 cm long and 2 cm in diameter, velvety with short hairs, red in colour, sterile red bract one, bracts persistent at the opening of the first female flowers
    Buds
    Male bud lanceolate, 8 – 10 × 2.8 – 3 cm, bracts bright red on both sides, no imbrications, not waxy, lifting 1 – 2 bracts at a time, revolute before falling; male flowers 2 – 3 per bract in 1 row, falling with the bract, compound tepal 3.6 – 3.8 cm long, yellow in colour with 5-toothed orange apex, the central lobes smaller than the outer lobes, free tepal as long as compound tepal, translucent white, oblong, with a short orange acumen, stamens 5, cream, pale yellow style with inserted light green stigma, anthers at the same level, stigma inserted, ovary straight, pale yellow, without pigmentation Female bud lanceolate, 13 – 15 × 3.8 – 4 cm, bracts bright red on both sides, no imbrications, not waxy, lifting several bracts at a time, revolute; basal flowers hermaphrodite, 2 – 3 per bract, 3 – 5 hands, ovary light green 2.5 – 3 cm long, arrangements of ovules in two rows per locule; compound tepal 3.8 – 4 cm long, orange-yellow in colour with 5-toothed orange apex, free tepal as long as compound tepal, translucent white, obtuse, truncate apex, stamens 5, dark brown to black
    Fruits
    Fruit bunch lax, with 3 – 5 hands and 2 – 3 fruits per hand on average, in 1 row, fingers perpendicular to the stalk, individual fruit to 6.5 – 7 cm long, straight, angular, immature fruit peel colour light green, becoming pale yellow variegated with red at maturity; seeds black, irregularly depressed, to 3 – 4 mm in diameter, 40 – 50 seeds per fruit
    Conservation
    This taxon is very common and its status is assessed as Least Concern (LC) (IUCN 2001).
    Note
    Musa sanguinea Hook. f. was discovered in 1869 by Mann, in the Mahuni forests on the banks of the BooreeDeling River in Upper Assam, India (Hooker 1872). Hooker (1872) diagnosed it from a flowering plant at Kew Gardens in January 1872 and provided an illustration, t. 5975, which is designated here as the lectotype. After the illustration was drawn, parts of the inflorescence and fruits were preserved in liquid (K 32103.000!). This specimen includes a label which indicates that the seeds were collected in Assam.

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Assam, East Himalaya, Tibet

    Introduced into:

    Bangladesh, Myanmar

    Synonyms

    Other Data

    Musa sanguinea Hook.f. appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    India 32103.000
    s.coll. [s.n.], India K000906572

    Bibliography

    First published in Bot. Mag. 98: t. 5975 (1872)

    Accepted by

    • Mostaph, M.K. & Uddin, S.B. (2013). Dictionary of plant names of Bangladesh, Vasc. Pl.: 1-434. Janokalyan Prokashani, Chittagong, Bangladesh.
    • Häkkinen, M. & Väre, H. (2008). Typification and check-list of Musa L. names (Musaceae) with nomenclatural notes Adansonia, III, 30: 63-112.
    • Häkkinen, M. (2005). Ornamental bananas: notes on the section Rhodochlamys (Musaceae) Folia Malaysiana 6: 49-72.
    • Govaerts, R. (2004). World Checklist of Monocotyledons Database in ACCESS: 1-54382. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Liu, A.Z., Li, D.Z. & Li, X.W. (2002). Taxonomic notes on wild bananas (Musa) from China Botanical Bulletin of Academia Sinica 43: 77-81.

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin

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    Kew Backbone Distributions

    • Mostaph, M.K. & Uddin, S.B. (2013). Dictionary of plant names of Bangladesh, Vasc. Pl.: 1-434. Janokalyan Prokashani, Chittagong, Bangladesh.
    • Häkkinen, M. (2005). Ornamental bananas: notes on the section Rhodochlamys (Musaceae) Folia Malaysiana 6: 49-72.

    Sources

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.
    Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0