1. Family: Zingiberaceae Martinov
    1. Genus: Zingiber Mill.
      1. Zingiber cernuum Dalzell

        A perennial herb from western India, curved-stem ginger owes its common name to the tips of its leafy stems, which are always curved. Zingiber cernuum is a member of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae), which also includes common ginger ( Zingiber officinale).

    [KSP]

    Kew Species Profiles

    General Description
    Curved-stem ginger is a perennial herb native to western India.

    A perennial herb from western India, curved-stem ginger owes its common name to the tips of its leafy stems, which are always curved. Zingiber cernuum is a member of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae), which also includes common ginger ( Zingiber officinale).

    Species Profile

    Geography and distribution

    Zingiber cernuum is native to the Western Ghats of western India, where it has been recorded as common in moist shady places in semi-evergreen forests. It has been reported to occur in Karnataka, Maharashtra and Kerala.

    Description

    Overview: Perennial herb, up to about 1–2 m. Leafy stems are bright green and always curved at the tip.

    Leaves: Oblong-lanceolate, smooth on both sides.

    Flowers: Borne directly from the rootstock, appearing just above the ground. The lip is variegated red and white and the side lobes are variegated red and yellow.

    Fruits:Yellowish-white and smooth. Seeds are red and striated (marked with fine, longitudinal grooves) when unripe.

    Threats and conservation

    Zingiber cernuum is reported to be fairly common in its natural habitat, with a widespread distribution, and is not considered to be threatened at this time. However, most natural forest in the region has been cleared and converted to agriculture and plantations. The remaining habitat is highly fragmented in a region where the human population density is high, and hence ongoing monitoring of this species is desirable.

    It is estimated that between 1920 and 1990 forest cover in the Western Ghats declined by 40%, and few large blocks of intact forest remain. Many remaining forest patches that harbour endemic species are being converted to rubber, eucalyptus, coffee, teak, tea, cardamom or coconut plantations.

    Conservation assessments carried out by Kew

    Zingiber cernuum is being monitored as part of the IUCN Sampled Red List Index for Plants project, which aims to produce conservation assessments for a representative sample of the world’s plant species. This information will then be used to monitor trends in extinction risk and help focus conservation efforts where they are needed most.

    This species at Kew

    Theodore Cooke wrote in The Flora of the Presidency of Bombay in 1908 of the difficulty of obtaining specimens of curved-stem ginger: ‘The plant unfortunately flowers in July, at which time the whole of the hill-sides are streaming with water, rendering plant-collecting a task of no ordinary difficulty. It is hoped that local botanists will endeavour to procure specimens, describe them when fresh, and send some to the Kew Herbarium.’ Despite his optimism, there are no herbarium specimens of Zingiber cernuum at Kew to-date.

    The details, including some images, of pressed and dried specimens of many other Zingiber species can be seen in Kew’s Herbarium Catalogue.

    Various members of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) are grown in the hot, moist section of the Princess of Wales Conservatory.

    Distribution
    India
    Ecology
    Semi-evergreen forest.
    Conservation
    Least Concern (LC) according to IUCN Red List criteria.
    Hazards

    None known.

    Images

    Distribution

    Common Names

    English
    Curved-stem ginger

    Zingiber cernuum Dalzell appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Hooker's J. Bot. Kew Gard. Misc. 4: 342 (1852)

    Accepted in:

    • [3] Govaerts, R. (2004) World Checklist of Monocotyledons Database in ACCESS . The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

    Literature

    • [1] World Checklist of Selected Plant Families (2010). Zingiber cernuum. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • [2] Rommand-Monnier, F. (2009). Zingiber cernuum. Assessment using IUCN Categories and Criteria 3.1 (IUCN 2001). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • [4] Cooke, T. (1908). Zingiber cernuum. In: The Flora of the Presidency of Bombay Volume 2, p. 734. Taylor and Francis, London.
    • [5] Dalzell, N. A. (1852). Contributions to the botany of western India. Hooker's Journal of Botany and Kew Garden Miscellany 4: 342.

    Sources

    International Plant Names Index
    The International Plant Names Index (2016). Published on the Internet http://www.ipni.org
    [A] © Copyright 2016 International Plant Names Index. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Species Profiles
    Kew Species Profiles
    [B] http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
    [C]

    World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
    World Checklist of Selected Plant Families(2016). Published on the Internet http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    [D] See http://kew.org/about-kew/website-information/legal-notices/index.htm You may use data on these Terms and Conditions and on further condition that: The data is not used for commercial purposes; You may copy and retain data solely for scholarly, educational or research purposes; You may not publish our data, except for small extracts provided for illustrative purposes and duly acknowledged; You acknowledge the source of the data by the words "With the permission of the Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew" in a position which is reasonably prominent in view of your use of the data; Any other use of data or any other content from this website may only be made with our prior written agreement. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
    [E] © Copyright 2016 International Plant Names Index and World Checkist of Selected Plant Families. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0