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This species is accepted, and its native range is Central Malesia to Papuasia and N. Australia.
A specimen from Kew's Herbarium

[KBu]

Coode, M.J.E. (2019). Elaeocarpus for Flora Malesiana: the Oreocarpus group in Malesia. Kew Bulletin 74: 35. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-019-9818-1

Conservation
Least Concern.
Ecology
A wide range of habitats and altitudes.
Morphology General Habit
From slender shrublets to canopy trees 1 – 35 m high
Morphology Leaves
Leaves spirally arranged, loosely grouped towards twig tips; petioles 1 – 4.5 (– 6) cm long, 0.7 – 1 ( –1.4) mm, glabrous to persistently hairy, with sparse, short, straight, adpressed hairs, distinctly grooved above in apical third at least, distinct from leaf-base, obviously swollen at apex, somewhat to obviously swollen and usually geniculate at base; blades chartaceous or coriaceous, mostly ovate, some specimens oblong-ovate or elliptic-ovate, sometimes elliptic, 2 – 4.4 (– 5.2) × as long as wide, (4 –) 5 – 15 × 1.4 – 5.5 (– 6) cm, acuminate, narrowly acute to obtuse at apex (30 – 90° — each specimen with only part of this range), cuneate to broadly rounded at base or tapering towards a narrowly rounded base and sometimes truncate to weakly cordate, dull above, youngest leaves markedly glossy-silky above or glabrous throughout, mostly glabrous when mature, sometimes with a few scattered adpressed hairs beneath, with (3 –) 5 – 9 pairs of main lateral veins (low numbers in the Philippines, high numbers mostly in New Guinea, midrange throughout the distribution) at 40 – 60° to midrib but usually very faint so difficult to count and measure, fine venation network obscure to clear and raised above, areoles < 2 mm across, midrib prominent and main lateral veins scarcely prominent beneath and branching ½ to 7/8 inside margin, domatia absent
Morphology Leaves Leaf lamina Leaf margin
Margins usually clearly toothed (at extremes of flower-size variation ± entire), teeth (2 –) 3 – 7 mm apart
Morphology Leaves Stipules
Stipules caducous, narrow-triangular, thick, tough, tapering to a point, glabrous or with a few hairs, 1.5 – 3.5 mm long, entire
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamens (26 –) 30 – 45 inserted between disk and ovary, falling at the same time as sepals; filaments ± straight, (0.5 –) 1 – 2.5 (– 3) mm long, fattest just above the base, minutely hairy, anthers minutely sparsely hairy, (1.5 –) 2 – 5 mm long (up to 7 mm in some large-flowered New Guinea specimens), outer tooth clearly much longer than inner and with a slender awn (0.5 –) 1 – 2.5 (– 3) mm long, often reflexed
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Sepals falling at the same time as petals and stamens, (5 –) 6 – 15 (– 16) mm long × (1.2 –) 1.5 – 3 mm, glabrous to medium to dense-hairy outside (very variable between specimens), variably minutely hairy inside, with a low keel inside at base fading towards tip
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Petals thick-membranous, just translucent, obovate to narrow obovate (sometimes almost oblong), narrowed in lower third but not constricted into a claw (occasionally margins infold, thus petals may appear spathulate), (7 –) 9 – 19 mm long (very variable between specimens), (2 –) 3 – 6 (– 7)mm wide at widest point of limb, rounded at apex (sometimes ± pointed when dried), with (11 –) 15 – 30 (– 44) apical divisions unequal in length and grouped into lobes, divisions narrow, linear, 0.5 – 4 (– 5)mm long, mostly glabrous outside, sometimes a few short to long shining ± adpressed hairs near the base or centre), margins densely hairy, variously hairy inside (variable between specimens): sometimes just on keel and margins, sometimes throughout the lower 1/3 – ½, keel present inside, petals usually somewhat infolded at midpoint and 2-pocketed at base, the margins somewhat infolded
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Disc
Disk a glabrous, 10-toothed ring
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Ovary
Ovary placed above the disk, clearly narrowed at base, (1 –) 1.5 – 2.2 mm long, glabrous, 2-locular; ovules 8 – 10 (– 12) per loculus; style tapering to a point, (4.5 –) 5 – 15 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruits mostly round, sometimes broad-ellipsoid, 1 – 2 cm long when dried, terete, not flattened, rounded to obtuse at apex, rounded at base, glabrous; mesocarp 1 – 3 mm thick depending on sculpturing; stones ovoid, ellipsoid, obovoid or ovoid with a distinct stipe at base, 0.9 – 1.9 cm long, surface after boiling not persistently fibrous, sutures on surface visible in apical half at least (rarely unclear at base), without longitudinal ridges or crests, surface ± tuberculate to strongly tuberculate or deeply concave-sculptured (forms with small fruits merely rugose-tuberculate, the largest often deeply sculptured), sometimes slightly flattened in TS towards apex, stone wall 0.5 – 1.5 mm thick; loculus 1, central, roughly circular; seed 1, embryo curved and narrow, with entire endosperm.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Racemes usually borne behind the leaves, sometimes a few young ones in axils of current leaves, 2 – 7 (– 9) cm long, axis slender, mostly glabrous, some sparsely adpressed-hairy to +/- puberulous, bearing (3 –) 5 – 15 bisexual 5-merous flowers scattered throughout raceme nearly to base; bracts early caducous, only 3 specimens with bracts1 somewhat expanded, 1.5 – 2 mm long (– 5 mm), entire or with some lateral teeth, bracteoles absent; pedicels 5 – 15 (– 20) mm long in flower, slender, 8 – 15 (– 26) mm long in fruit; buds ovoid, acute
Morphology Twigs
Twigs glabrous, hairy at tip or (rarely) persistently hairy behind current shoot growth, with sparse to fairly dense, short to medium-long, straight, adpressed hairs, twigs 1 – 2.5 mm thick near tip, the twig-bark often longitudinally ridged when dried and with prominent leaf-scars, terminal buds non-resinous
Note
While total variation in the Philippines is less than in New Guinea, Mandia 435 (Mindoro, Mt Halcon) has large flowers and coriaceous leaves, looking more like some New Guinea material. Elaeocarpus viscosus was named by Warburg after the gum he observed on the young twigs and Schlechter in his key (1916: 127) states ‘Kelch klebrig’; however, there seems nothing out of the ordinary on the Kew duplicate. Leaves are 9 – 11 × 3.6 – 4.4 cm; petioles 2.2 – 3.5 mm; petals c. 14 × 6 – 7 mm divided into 40 – 44 laciniae — compare E. boridiensis below in which the flowers are very similar.
Type
NE New Guinea [Papua New Guinea, Morobe Prov.], Finisterre Mts, c. 2300 m, Oct. 1888, Hellwig 316 (holotype B†). Neotype: Papua New Guinea, E Highlands D., Sinasiiva, SE of Kundiawa, 2550 m, flowers white, 27 May 1968, P. J. B. Woods, M. Black & L. Searle 1584 (neotype E! isoneotype L!) — this specimen is in flower and combines proximity to the type locality and comparable altitude.

Native to:

Bismarck Archipelago, Maluku, New Guinea, Northern Territory, Philippines, Queensland, Sulawesi

Elaeocarpus culminicola Warb. appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
Nov 8, 2010 Weiblen [GW 2663], Papua New Guinea K000612402
Jan 24, 2005 Ingle [191], Philippines K000223088
Jan 24, 2005 Ingle [697], Philippines K000223080
Jul 13, 2004 Gaerlan et al. [19876], Philippines K000270500
Feb 18, 2004 Elmer, A.D.E. [5801], Philippines K000708284 Unknown type material
Feb 18, 2004 s.coll. [18039], Philippines K000708283
Feb 17, 2004 s.coll. [11860], Philippines K000708285
Feb 4, 2004 Carr, C.E. [14981], Papua New Guinea K000708320 Unknown type material
Feb 4, 2004 Carr, C.E. [13798], Papua New Guinea K000708319 Unknown type material
Dec 19, 1975 Forbes, H.O. [717], New Guinea K000708321 Unknown type material
Dec 19, 1975 Brass, L.J. [7865], Papua New Guinea K000708322 Unknown type material
Gray, B. [2428] 46972.000
Hellwig, F. [248], New Guinea K000708318 Unknown type material
s.coll. [571], Queensland K000708440 Unknown type material
Jul 15, 2004 Takeuchi, W. [14695], Papua New Guinea Elaeocarpus sogerensis K000270542

First published in Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 16: 23 (1892)

Accepted by

  • Govaerts, R. (2001). World Checklist of Seed Plants Database in ACCESS E-F: 1-50919.

Literature

Kew Bulletin

  • Baker, E. G. (1923). Dr. H.O. Forbes’s New Guinea Plants. J. Bot. 61 (Suppl.: 6).
  • Coode, M. J. E. (1978). A conspectus of Elaeocarpaceae in Papuasia. Brunonia 1(2): 131 – 302.
  • Coode, M. J. E. (1981). Elaeocarpaceae. In: E. E. Henty (ed.), Handbooks of the Flora of Papua New Guinea, Vol. II. Melbourne University Press.
  • Coode, M. J. E. (1984). Elaeocarpus in Australia and New Zealand. Kew Bull. 39: 509 – 586.
  • Crayn, D. M., Rosetto, M. & Maynard, D. J. (2006). Molecular phylogeny and dating reveals an Oligo-Miocene radiation of dry-adapted shrubs (former Tremandraceae) from rain-forest tree progenitors (Elaeocarpaceae) in Australia. Amer. J. Bot. 93: 1328 – 1342.
  • Elmer, A. D. E. (1911). Additional species of Elaeocarpus. Leafl. Philipp. Bot. 4: 1171 – 1190.
  • Elmer, A. D. E. (1919). New woody plants from Mount Maquiling. Leafl. Philipp. Bot. 8: 3069 – 3105.
  • Knuth, R. (1940). Elaeocarpaceae novae. Decades 3 – 4. Repert. Spec. Nov. Regni Veg. 48: 72 – 79.
  • Merrill, E. D. (1905). New or noteworthy Philippine plants III. Publ. Bur. Sci. Gov. Lab. 29: 5 – 62.
  • Merrill, E. D. (1952). Reductions in Elaeocarpus. Proc. Roy. Soc. Queensland 62: 49 – 56.
  • Pulle, A. A. (1912). Résultats de l’Expédition scientifique Néerlandaise à la Nouvelle-Guinée en 1907 et 1909; Elaeocarpaceae. Nova Guinea, Bot. 8 (1911): 661 – 662.
  • Schlechter, R. (1916). Die Elaeocarpaceen Papuasiens. Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 54: 92 – 155.
  • Smith, A. C. (1944). Studies of Papuasian plants VI. Elaeocarpus L. J. Arnold Arbor. 25: 222 – 270.
  • Warburg, O. (1893). Bergpflanze aus Kaiser-Wilhelmsland. Bot. Jarhb. Syst. 16: 1 – 32.
  • Warburg, O. (1894). Plantae Hellwigianae. Beitrage zur Flora von Kaiser Wilhelmsland. Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 18: 184 – 212.
  • Weibel, R. (1968). Morphologie de l’embryon et de la graine des Elaeocarpus. Candollea 23: 101 – 108.
  • Weibel, R. (1984). Réhabilitation de deux espèces d’Elaeocarpus, E. sterrophyllus Schlechter et E. filiformi-dentatus Knuth. Candollea 39: 281 – 286.
  • White, C. T. (1919). Contributions to the Queensland Flora. Dept. Agric. Brisbane. Bot. Bull. 21: 3.
  • White, C. T. (1933). Nomenclatural notes on some Australian and Philippine Islands Plants. Bull. Misc. Inform., Kew 1933(1): 45 – 46.

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (2014-continuously updated). Atlas of Living Australia http://www.ala.org.au/.

Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Bulletin
Kew Bulletin
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0