1. Family: Araceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Arum L.
      1. Arum pictum L.f.

        Arum pictum is unique in the genus Arum in its autumn-flowering, and in this respect, as well as in its horse-dung-like scent, resembles members of the related genus Biarum. The shiny, purplish and silver leaves are very beautiful, and persist through the winter.

    [KSP]
    General Description
    Arum pictum is a low-growing, autumn-flowering arum with beautiful, shiny leaves and a purple spathe.

    Arum pictum is unique in the genus Arum in its autumn-flowering, and in this respect, as well as in its horse-dung-like scent, resembles members of the related genus Biarum. The shiny, purplish and silver leaves are very beautiful, and persist through the winter.

    Species Profile

    Geography and distribution

    Native to Majorca (Mallorca), Minorca, Corsica, Sardinia and the west coast of central Italy.

    Description

    Overview: A winter-growing herb with a whitish tuber 5–7 cm across.

    Leaves: The arrow-head-shaped leaves are about 30 cm long and 15 cm wide. At first they are shiny and purplish, later becoming silvery or whitish.

    Flowers: The flowering stem (spadix) appears with or before the leaves, and smells strongly of horse dung. The spadix is 8–13 cm long, the appendage stout, cylindrical and purplish-black. The sheathing bract (spathe) is 9–19 cm long, 4–6.5 cm wide, greenish on the outside, deep, velvety purple-brown on the inside, with a mottled, greenish tip, and is slightly hooded. Three whorls of organs are found at the base of the spadix and enclosed in the folded spathe: the uppermost is a whorl of bristly staminodes (sterile stamens); in the middle there is a large cluster of small, male flowers; beneath there is a cluster of larger, female flowers.

    Fruits:The fruits, which are red when ripe, are berries 5–11 mm long.

    Threats and conservation

    The habitat of Arum pictum, like that of all Mediterranean coastal plants, is under pressure as a result of spreading urban development, particularly building for tourism.

    Uses

    Arum pictum is cultivated as an ornamental.

    Millennium Seed Bank: Seed storage

    The Millennium Seed Bank Partnership aims to save plant life world wide, focusing on plants under threat and those of most use in the future. Seeds are dried, packaged and stored at a sub-zero temperature in Kew's seed bank vault at Wakehurst.

    Number of seed collections stored in the Millennium Seed Bank:Three

    Cultivation

    Arum pictumis easily grown in a large pot. It should be kept dry in the summer, and watered in the winter (until May).

    This species at Kew

    Arum pictum is grown in the Rock Garden at Kew and may also be on display in the Davies Alpine House when it is flowering (October).

    Pressed and dried specimens of Arum pictum are held in Kew’s Herbarium, where they are available to researchers from around the world, by appointment. The details of some of these can be seen online in the Herbarium Catalogue.

    Distribution
    Italy
    Ecology
    Mediterranean scrubland; often under Pinus halepensis.
    Conservation
    No specific threats are known, although the Mediterranean coastal habitat is being reduced as a result of urban development.
    Hazards

    None known, although related species of Arum are poisonous.

    Images

    Distribution

    Found In:

    Baleares, Corse, Italy, Sardegna

    Arum pictum L.f. appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Identified Reference Herbarium Specimen Type Status
    Ferguson, L.F. [4126], Spain 51818.000

    First published in Suppl. Pl.: 410 (1782)

    Accepted in:

    • [2] Govaerts, R. & Frodin, D.G. (2002) World Checklist and Bibliography of Araceae (and Acoraceae) . The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • [3] Govaerts, R. (1995) World Checklist of Seed Plants 1(1, 2): 1-483, 1-529. MIM, Deurne.

    Literature

    • [1] World Checklist of Selected Plant Families (2010). The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. (Accessed 25 May 2011).
    • [4] Boyce, P. (1993). The Genus Arum. Kew Magazine Monograph, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • [5] Boyce, P. (1988). Arum pictum. Curtis’s Bot. Mag. 5: 72-76.

    Sources

    International Plant Names Index
    The International Plant Names Index (2016). Published on the Internet http://www.ipni.org
    [A] © Copyright 2016 International Plant Names Index. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Species Profiles
    Kew Species Profiles
    [B] http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
    [C]

    World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
    World Checklist of Selected Plant Families(2016). Published on the Internet http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    [D] See http://kew.org/about-kew/website-information/legal-notices/index.htm You may use data on these Terms and Conditions and on further condition that: The data is not used for commercial purposes; You may copy and retain data solely for scholarly, educational or research purposes; You may not publish our data, except for small extracts provided for illustrative purposes and duly acknowledged; You acknowledge the source of the data by the words "With the permission of the Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew" in a position which is reasonably prominent in view of your use of the data; Any other use of data or any other content from this website may only be made with our prior written agreement. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
    [E] © Copyright 2016 International Plant Names Index and World Checkist of Selected Plant Families. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0