Psidium L.

First published in Sp. Pl.: 470 (1753)
This genus is accepted
The native range of this genus is Mexico to Tropical America.

Descriptions

George R. Proctor (2012). Flora of the Cayman Isands (Second Edition). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Morphology General Habit
Shrubs or trees, often with strongly pinnate-veined leaves
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers axillary, solitary or in 3-flowered dichasia, or otherwise clustered; calyx closed or somewhat open in bud, usually splitting irregularly down to the ovary at anthesis, producing 4 or 5 distinct teeth or lobes; hypanthium usually prolonged beyond the summit of the ovary, the free portion splitting with the calyx-lobes
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Petals 4 or 5, usually white
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamens numerous in several series from a broad disc. Ovary usually 3–4-celled (rarely 2- or up to 7-celled), with numerous ovules on bilamellate placentas of parietal origin
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruit a fleshy berry, sometimes large and edible; seeds more or less kidney-shaped, hard and bony; embryo curved or C-shaped, with small cotyledons and a long radicle.
Distribution
A tropical American genus of more than 100 species.
[Cayman]

Myrtaceae, F. White. Flora Zambesiaca 4. 1978

Morphology General Habit
Trees or shrubs.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescence axillary, 1–3-flowered.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Calyx unlobed and almost or completely concealing the corolla before anthesis, subsequently splitting irregularly into 4–5-lobes, persistent.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Petals 4–5.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamens numerous, free.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Ovary
Ovary imperfectly 4–5-locular, with 4–5 intrusive, parietal placentae; ovules numerous.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruit a berry with numerous angular seeds.
[FZ]

Myrtaceae, B. Verdcourt, B.Sc., Ph.D.. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 2001

Morphology General Habit
Trees or shrubs
Morphology Leaves
Leaves opposite (at least in ours)
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescence axillary, 1–3-flowered
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Calyx unlobed and almost or completely concealing the corolla before anthesis, subsequently splitting irregularly into 4–5 lobes, persistent
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Petals 4–5
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamens numerous, free
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Ovary
Ovary imperfectly (2–)4–5(–7)-locular with 4–5 intrusive parietal placentas; ovules numerous
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruit a berry with numerous angular seeds.
[FTEA]

Timothy M. A. Utteridge and Laura V. S. Jennings (2022). Trees of New Guinea. Kew Publishing. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Distribution
Its native range is from South America to Mexico, but it has become widely naturalised in subtropical and tropical areas of the world, including New Guinea. A genus of about 100 species.
Morphology General Habit
Shrubs and small trees to 9 m tall; bark scaly, young branchlets 4-angled
Morphology Leaves
Leaves elliptic to ovate, apex obtuse, acute or revolute, midrib and lateral veins equally prominent (in New Guinea). Inflorescence solitary, in triads or dichasia
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers 4–5-merous; calyx lobes partly fused, tearing between the lobes, persistent and erect in fruit; ovary ±inferior
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruit fleshy, obovate to globular, exocarp leathery, yellowish or pink; mesocarp white or pink (in New Guinea)
Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds
Seeds reniform, embedded in the mesocarp, testa rough and very hard; embryo C-shaped with small cotyledons.
Ecology
Psidium is widely cultivated for the fruits (guava) and may also be naturalised in almost any habitat.
Recognition
The prominent, ladder-like secondary venation, calyx lobes that tear when the flowers open and the rough, hard seeds embedded in the fleshy mesocarp should distinguish Psidium from other Myrtaceae in New Guinea. Psidium guajava L. (guava) and P. cattleyanum Sabine (strawberry guava) are widely cultivated for their fruit and these are the species most likely to be encountered in New Guinea.
[TONG]

Sources

  • Flora Zambesiaca

    • Flora Zambesiaca
    • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
  • Flora of Tropical East Africa

    • Flora of Tropical East Africa
    • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
  • Flora of the Cayman Islands

    • Flora of the Cayman Islands
    • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
  • Herbarium Catalogue Specimens

  • Kew Backbone Distributions

    • The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants 2024. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and https://powo.science.kew.org/
    • © Copyright 2023 World Checklist of Vascular Plants. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
  • Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone

    • The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants 2024. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and https://powo.science.kew.org/
    • © Copyright 2023 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
  • Kew Science Photographs

    • Copyright applied to individual images
  • Trees of New Guinea

    • Trees of New Guinea
    • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0