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This species is accepted, and its native range is Angola.

[KBu]

Darbyshire, I., Tripp, E.A. & Chase, F.M. (2019). A taxonomic revision of Acanthaceae tribe Barlerieae in Angola and Namibia. Part 1. Kew Bulletin 74: 5. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-018-9791-0

Conservation
Although restricted to southwestern Angola, this species is fairly widespread there with an EOO of 90,868 km2, and is locally common to abundant in suitable habitat particularly in the region of Lubango (Couto 231; D. Goyder, pers. comm.). Threats are considered to be low in view of the fact that it favours dry rocky sites, often growing amongst boulders, although browsing by livestock may impact some local populations. It is assessed as of Least Concern — LC.
Distribution
Endemic to southwestern Angola (Benguela, Huíla and Namibe Provinces).
Ecology
Barleria rupicola is found on rocky soils and amongst boulders on hillslopes with dry bushland or secondary dry forest, in open woodland, on termitaria or on hard clay; (50 –) 1000 – 2400 m elevation. It is a species primarily of the Colophospermum mopane woodland zone of southwest Angola, with less frequent outliers in desert areas. Its range is centred on the Huíla plateau, a known centre of plant endemism (Exell & Gonçalves 1973; Linder 2001; Figueiredo 2008).
Morphology General Habit
Perennial herb or subshrub, much-branched from towards the woody base, prostrate or decumbent, then 30 – 100 cm tall; stems with dense appressed or antrorse yellow-buff hairs, or sometimes spreading and with a swollen base, also with shorter, finer retrorse or spreading whitish hairs on two opposite sides
Morphology Leaves
Leaves sessile or petiole to 4 mm long; blade elliptic, lanceolate or ovate, more rarely somewhat obovate when young, 1.5 – 4.5 × 0.5 – 1.8 cm (l:w ratio 2.2 – 3.2:1), base cuneate, attenuate or obtuse, margin entire, revolute particularly when young, apex acute or rarely rounded when young, mucronulate; margin and veins beneath yellow-buff strigose, with dense finer spreading whitish or brown hairs between veins when young, upper surface antrorse-hairy; lateral veins (3 –) 4 – 5 (– 6) pairs, prominent beneath, reticulate tertiary venation also conspicuous beneath at least when young
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamens inserted in lower half of corolla tube; filaments 17 – 31 mm long; anthers exserted, 3 – 4 mm long; lateral staminodes 2 – 3 mm long, filaments pilose, antherodes 1 – 1.2 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Calyx mauve-brown, sometimes paler towards base and centre of outer lobes, with prominent palmate-reticulate venation, turning pale brown-scarious in fruit; anterior and posterior lobes subequal, obovate or elliptic, 11 – 18 × 5 – 10.5 mm, base cuneate or attenuate, margin spinulose-dentate, teeth with an apical bristle, more rarely subentire, apex rounded or truncate to shortly attenuate in outline, with 1 – 3 short spines or teeth, external surface with (sub)appressed buff or yellow-buff hairs mainly along main veins, with or without scattered short patent glandular hairs; lateral lobes linear-lanceolate, 7.5 – 11.5 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Corolla white or lilac to purple, (26 –) 29 – 44 mm long, glandular-pilose and with short subappressed eglandular hairs externally; tube 18 – 26.5 mm long, narrowly funnel-shaped above attachment point of stamens, cylindrical below; limb in “2+3” configuration; abaxial lobe obovate, (8 –) 11 – 15.5 × (7 –) 8.5 – 13 mm, apex emarginate or truncate; lateral lobes elliptic, rounded or obovate, (7.5 –) 9 – 15.5 × (6 –) 8 – 14.5 mm, apices rounded, truncate or acute; adaxial lobes elliptic, (6 –) 9 – 13 × (4.5 –) 5.5 – 9.5 mm, apices obtuse or acute
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Ovary
Ovary glabrous; style with tuft of declinate pale hairs at base or sparsely so; stigma linear or clavate, 0.8 – 1.4 mm long, apex with 2 ± uneven lobes
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Capsule 4-seeded, 15.5 – 18.5 mm long, glabrous; immature seeds only seen.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescences of axillary and subterminal single- or rarely 2-flowered cymes, often crowded on short lateral branches, sessile or peduncle to 3 mm long; bracteoles linear or lanceolate, 5 – 14 × 1 – 3 mm, triangular or conduplicate in cross section, margin entire or with minute teeth formed by swollen hair bases, apex spinose or shortly so
Note
The species epithet “rupicola”, meaning “rock-dwelling”, refers to this species’ preference for rock outcrops and rocky slopes. Barleria rupicola replaces the widespread B. crassa C. B. Clarke on rocky slopes in western Angola. The two are clearly closely allied but are easily separated by comparison in the herbarium. The most consistent diagnostic characters are listed in the Recognition section. However, in practice, B. rupicola is most easily separated from most populations of B. crassa, including those from Angola, by the obovate or elliptic calyx lobes with a gradually cuneate or attenuate base, vs broadly ovate with a rounded, truncate or cordate base in B. crassa. The only exception to this rule is B. crassa subsp. ramulosoides I. Darbysh., recently described from East Zambia (Darbyshire 2015), which has elliptic or obovate calyces. It is nevertheless easily separated from B. rupicola by, in addition to the characters listed under Recognition, its more shrubby habit, with leaves and persistent spinose bracteoles crowded between short internodes, a more conspicuous mucro on the leaf tip, and larger anthers, 4 – 5 mm long. Barleria rupicola resembles Barleria crassa but differs in (i) having a more trailing or spreading habit; (ii) the mature leaves being acute at the apex, vs obtuse to rounded in B. crassa (both have a short mucro); (iii) the corolla tube being more narrowly funnel-shaped above the insertion of the stamens, and can appear largely cylindrical in living material, vs always funnel-shaped in B. crassa; (iv) the young calyx drying a dark purplish-brown at least in the upper half and towards the margins (vs green or mauve in B. crassa) and having a finer reticulate venation; and (v) the lateral calyx lobes being 7.5 – 11.5 mm long and usually more than half as long as the outer lobes (vs 3 – 8.5 mm and less than half as long in B. crassa).
Type
Angola, Huíla, prox. de Sá da Bandeira [Lubango], nas faldas da Serra do Lubango, fl. 5 July 1962, Barbosa & Moreno 10271 (holotype K! [K001009481]; isotype PRE!).

Native to:

Angola

Barleria rupicola I.Darbysh. appears in other Kew resources:

First published in Kew Bull. 74(1)-5: 50 (2019)

Accepted by

  • Govaerts, R., Nic Lughadha, E., Black, N., Turner, R. & Paton, A. (2021). The World Checklist of Vascular Plants, a continuously updated resource for exploring global plant diversity. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-021-00997-6 Scientific Data 8: 215.

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Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Bulletin
Kew Bulletin
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Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0