Genus:
Ouret Adans.

Ouret lanata (L.) Kuntze

This species is accepted, and its native range is Africa to Tropical Asia.

[FWTA]

Amaranthaceae, Hutchinson and Dalziel. Flora of West Tropical Africa 1:1. 1954

Morphology General Habit
Straggling herb, to 3 ft. high
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers white
Ecology
In moister localities than the above (Aerva javanica).

[FZ]

Amaranthaceae, C. C. Townsend. Flora Zambesiaca 9:1. 1988

Morphology General Habit
Perennial herb, sometimes flowering in the first year, frequently more or less woody and suffrutescent below, erect to prostrate, decumbent or occasionally somewhat scandent, stiff or weak and straggling, (0.1) 0.3–2 m., with numerous stems from the base and these frequently also branched above.
Morphology Stem
Stem and branches terete, striate, more or less densely lanate with whitish or yellowish, more or less shaggy hairs, more rarely tomentose or canescent.
Morphology Leaves
Leaves alternate, orbicular (not seen in the Flora Zambesiaca area) to lanceolate, spathulate or elliptic-ovate, shortly or more longly cuneate at the base with petioles from c. 2 cm. to obsolete, rounded and apiculate to acute at the apex, commonly densely lanate or canescent on the inferior surface and more thinly so above, rarely glabrous or (not seen in Flora Zambesiaca area) thickly lanuginose, those of the main stems c. 10–50 × 5–35 mm., those of the branches and inflorescence reducing and frequently becoming very small.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Spikes sessile, solitary or usually in axillary clusters on the main stems or long to very short axillary branches, 0.4–1.5(2) × 0.3–0.4 cm., divergent, more or less cylindrical, silky, white to creamy, forming a long inflorescence which is leafy to the extreme apex and forms no terminal panicle even on the main stems; bracts (0.75) 1–1.25 mm., deltoid-ovate to oblong-ovate, hyaline with a short but distinct arista formed by the excurrent midrib, pilose, persistent; bracteoles similar or slightly smaller, also persistent.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers female, male or hermaphrodite. Hermaphrodite flowers: outer 2 tepals hyaline, elliptic-oblong, more or less abruptly contracted at the apex to a distinct mucro formed by the excurrent nerve, 1–1.75(2) mm. long; inner 3 slightly shorter and narrower, acute with a broad central green vitta which extends for about three quarters the length of each tepal and is usually furnished with a thickened border; style short; stigmas short, patent or divergent; anthers perfect. Male flowers similar but the stigmas reduced and capitate or obsolete, scarcely papillose. Female flowers also similar, or commonly with the tepals longer and narrower, tapering above, the outer to c. 2.25 mm. long; stigmas longer and frequently equalling the style, linear, divergent or suberect; filaments reduced, anthers absent.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Tepal
Tepals more or less densely lanate dorsally.
sex Hermaphrodite
Hermaphrodite flowers: outer 2 tepals hyaline, elliptic-oblong, more or less abruptly contracted at the apex to a distinct mucro formed by the excurrent nerve, 1–1.75(2) mm. long; inner 3 slightly shorter and narrower, acute with a broad central green vitta which extends for about three quarters the length of each tepal and is usually furnished with a thickened border; style short; stigmas short, patent or divergent; anthers perfect.
sex Male
Male flowers similar but the stigmas reduced and capitate or obsolete, scarcely papillose.
sex Female
Female flowers also similar, or commonly with the tepals longer and narrower, tapering above, the outer to c. 2.25 mm. long; stigmas longer and frequently equalling the style, linear, divergent or suberect; filaments reduced, anthers absent.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Capsule c. 1 mm. long, circular, compressed; seed c. 0.6–0.8 mm. long, reniform, black, shining, the testa almost smooth in the centre, faintly reticulate around the margin.

[FSOM]

M. Thulin et al. Flora of Somalia Vol. 1-4 [updated 2008] https://plants.jstor.org/collection/FLOS

Morphology General Habit
Plant variable in habit, (0.1–)0.3–2 m, branched from the base and often upwards
Morphology Stem
Stems long and ascending or the upper branches when present short: stem and branches ± densely lanate with whitish or yellowish rather shaggy hairs, varying to greenish-canescent or densely tomentose
Morphology Leaves
Leaves alternate, varying from elliptic-lanceolate to ± round, commonly more thinly hairy above than below, rarely ± glabrous or thickly lanuginose, those of the main stem c. 10–50 x 5–35 mm, rapidly reducing and often very small above
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Spikes 0.4–1.5(–2) x 0.3–0.4 cm, solitary or clustered, sessile or on short to long axillary branches, all axillary, stems and branches leafy to the tip
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Tepal
Tepals ± densely lanate dorsally; outer 2 hyaline, oblong-elliptic, ± abruptly contracted to a short mucro formed by the excurrent midrib, 0.75–1.75 mm; inner 3 slightly shorter and narrower with the central vitta broad and usually thick-margined
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Female flowers frequently but not invariably with longer and narrower tepals, the outer to c. 2.25 mm, stigmas long, filaments without anthers Bisexual flowers with short but receptive stigmas and perfect anthers; probable male flowers with capitate, scarcely papillose stigmas Flowers female, bisexual and probably functionally male also
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Capsule c. 1 mm, round, compressed.
Distribution
N1–3; S1–3 widespread in the drier parts of the tropics and subtropics of the Old World from Africa (widespread) to New Guinea.
Ecology
Altitude range 10–1580 m.
Vernacular
Cisasi, fusi-fusi, hambooye, hambooye badeed, osinadei, wancad, wancad-yar, waneek (Somali)
Note
The great variability of A. lanata and the difficulty of separating these variations even at infraspecific level has been discussed elsewhere (Townsend in Kew Bull. 29: 461–463, 1974).

[FTEA]

Amaranthaceae, C.C. Townsend. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1985

Morphology General Habit
Perennial herb, sometimes flowering in the first year, frequently woody and suffrutescent below, prostrate to decumbent or erect (occasionally scandent), stiff or weak and straggling, (0.1–)0.3–2 m., branched from the base and often also above (upper branches short to long and slender even on the same plant), but stem and main basal branches often not further branched.
Morphology Stem
Stem and branches terete, striate, ± densely lanate with whitish ± shaggy hairs, more rarely tomentose or canescent.
Morphology Leaves
Leaves alternate, round to lanceolate- or ovate-elliptic, shortly or more longly cuneate at the base, rounded and apiculate to acute at the apex, commonly densely lanate or canescent on the lower surface and more thinly so above, sometimes subglabrous on the upper surface, rarely glabrous throughout or thickly lanuginose, those of the main stem 10–50 × 5–35 mm., those of the branches and upper part of the stem reducing and often becoming very small; petioles from 2 cm. down to almost none.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Spikes sessile, solitary or usually in axillary clusters on the main stems or long to very short axillary branches, 0.4–1.5(–2) × 0.3–0.4 cm., divergent, cylindrical, silky, white to creamy, forming a long inflorescence which is leafy to the ultimate spikes; bracts deltoid-ovate to oblong-ovate, 0.75–1 mm., membranous with a short arista formed by the excurrent midrib, pilose, persistent; bracteoles similar or slightly smaller, also persistent.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Tepal
Tepals ± densely lanate dorsally.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers ♀ or hermaphrodite (probably also sometimes functionally ♂). Female flowers:tepals sometimes similar to those of the hermaphrodite flowers but commonly longer and narrower, tapering above, the outer up to ± 2.25 mm., style slightly longer, stigmas distinctly longer and often equalling the style, linear, divergent or suberect; anthers absent, filaments reduced. Hermaphrodite flowers:outer 2 tepals hyaline, oval-oblong, ± abruptly contracted at the tip to a distinct mucro formed by the excurrent nerve, 0.75–1.75 mm. without the mucro; inner 3 slightly shorter and narrower, acute with a broad central green vitta along the midrib, which extends for about three-quarters of the length of each tepal and is often ± furnished with a thickened border; style short, stigmas very short and patent or divergent; anthers perfect; probable male flowers similar but stigmas reduced, subcapitate or very short, scarcely papillose.
sex Hermaphrodite
Hermaphrodite flowers:outer 2 tepals hyaline, oval-oblong, ± abruptly contracted at the tip to a distinct mucro formed by the excurrent nerve, 0.75–1.75 mm. without the mucro; inner 3 slightly shorter and narrower, acute with a broad central green vitta along the midrib, which extends for about three-quarters of the length of each tepal and is often ± furnished with a thickened border; style short, stigmas very short and patent or divergent; anthers perfect; probable male flowers similar but stigmas reduced, subcapitate or very short, scarcely papillose.
sex Female
Female flowers:tepals sometimes similar to those of the hermaphrodite flowers but commonly longer and narrower, tapering above, the outer up to ± 2.25 mm., style slightly longer, stigmas distinctly longer and often equalling the style, linear, divergent or suberect; anthers absent, filaments reduced.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Capsule rotund, compressed ± 1 mm.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds
Seed reniform, ± 0.6–0.8 mm., black, shining, the testa almost smooth in the centre, faintly reticulate around the margin.
Habitat
Very varied, from cultivated and disturbed ground to woodland, bushland and grassland, at swamp and forest edges, open lava screes and lava boulder-strewn hillsides, coastal sands, etc; 0–2030 m.
Distribution
K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 K6 K7 P T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 widespread in the drier parts of the tropics and subtropics of the Old World – in Africa from Sierra Leone across to Egypt, S. to South Africa (rare) and Madagascar, also in Seychelles, Chagos Archipelago, etcin Asia from Arabia E. to Malaysia, Malayan Is., the Philippines and New Guinea

Native to:

Angola, Assam, Bangladesh, Benin, Burkina, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Repu, Chad, Chagos Archipelago, Cocos (Keeling) Is., Comoros, Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Gulf of Guinea Is., India, Ivory Coast, Jawa, Kenya, KwaZulu-Natal, Laccadive Is., Lesser Sunda Is., Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaya, Maldives, Mozambique, Nepal, New Guinea, Nigeria, Northern Provinces, Philippines, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Socotra, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sumatera, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vietnam, Yemen, Zaïre, Zimbabwe

Introduced into:

Nicobar Is.

Ouret lanata (L.) Kuntze appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status Has image?
Nov 1, 2008 s.coll. [33a], Tanzania Aerva lanata K000662446 No
Jan 1, 2008 Romero et al. [PPI 38465], Philippines Aerva lanata K000611673 No
Jan 1, 2008 Romero et al. [PPI 864], Philippines Aerva lanata K000611674 No
May 1, 2006 Cheek, M. [11825], Cameroon Aerva lanata K000339702 No
May 1, 2006 Cheek, M. [11825], Cameroon Aerva lanata K000339703 No
Oct 24, 1972 Greenway, P.J. [1202], Tanzania Aerva lanata K000243704 holotype Yes
Oct 23, 1972 Koitschoner [2110], Kenya Aerva lanata K000243702 isotype Yes
Oct 23, 1972 illegible [12], Tanzania Aerva lanata K000243703 isotype Yes
Oct 23, 1972 Greenway [2689], Tanzania Aerva lanata K000243705 isotype Yes
Mar 1, 1905 Schimper [249], Ethiopia Aerva lanata K000243698 Yes
Mar 1, 1905 Schimper [249], Ethiopia Aerva lanata K000243699 Yes
Krauss [298], South Africa Aerva lanata K000243716 Yes
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6909] Aerva lanata K001126144 Yes
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6909] Aerva lanata K001126148 Yes
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6909] Aerva lanata K001126146 Yes
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6909], India Aerva lanata K001126145 Yes
Morton, J.K. [7128], Cameroon Aerva lanata K000025596 No
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6909] Aerva lanata K001126147 Yes
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6909] Aerva lanata K001126149 Yes
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6909] Aerva lanata K001126150 Yes
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6909], India Aerva lanata K001126143 Yes

First published in Revis. Gen. Pl. 2: 544 (1891)

Accepted by

  • Govaerts, R., Nic Lughadha, E., Black, N., Turner, R. & Paton, A. (2021). The World Checklist of Vascular Plants, a continuously updated resource for exploring global plant diversity. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-021-00997-6. Scientific Data 8: 215.

Literature

Kew Backbone Distributions

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