Pancratium centrale (A.Chev.) Traub

This species is accepted, and its native range is NE. Cameroon to W. Ethiopia.

[KBu]

Demissew, S., & Nordal, I. (2004). Pancratium centrale (= Mizonia contrails): A Rare Central African Species Discovered in Ethiopia. Kew Bulletin, 59(1), 117-121. doi:10.2307/4111082

Conservation
One could ask whether the species are extremely rare or whether they are undercollected due to a demographic pattern involving rare flowering. As far as Pancratium centrale is concerned, we do not know. Flowering specimens were, however, observed on two successive seasons in the Assosa area of Benshangul- Gumuz National Regional State in 2000 and 2001 and also in the Yalinga area of the Central African Republic in 1921 and 1922. When flowering, the plants are very showy. The very few collections of the species thus suggest rarity of occurrence rather than rarity of flowering. The problem of life forms in woodland with intense grass fires in West Ethiopia has recently been discussed by Menassie Gashaw et al. (2002).
Distribution
More observations are needed. Recently, other geophytes that are lilies in the widest sense have been newly recorded in the eastern parts of the Sudanian phytogeographic region, thus creating very disjunct distribution patterns: Drimia sudanica Friis & Vollesen (Hyacinthaceae) has a distribution gap from Fouta Djalon on the border between the Guinean Republic and Sierra Leone and the northern slopes of the Imatong Mountains in Southern Sudan (not far from the western escarpment of Ethiopia) (Friis & Vollesen 1999). Zygotritonia praecox Stapf (Iridaceae) was until recently known from West Africa from Senegal to Nigeria and in the Central African Republic, until it was discovered in western Ethiopia, in the same area as the localities of Pancratium centrale (Sebsebe et al. 2003; Sebsebe et al. 2004).
Ecology
Found, in the eastern parts of their range, in broad- leaved deciduous bushland/woodland dominated by species of Combretum and Terminalia. This vegetation type has been burnt annually for a long time, and the plants show clear adaptation to fire; indeed, controlled annual fires may be essential for the maintenance of many species.
Morphology Leaves
Leaves contemporary with the flowers, rosulate, sheathing; blade 30 - 50 x 1 - 3.5 cm, erect from the base gradually deflexing, glabrous, ensiform
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers pure white; perianth tube 1 - 2 cm long; perianth segments 3 - 5.5 x 0.5 - 0.8 cm, spreading; corona reduced to 12 triangular teeth, i.e., two teeth between each of the 6 stamens, each tooth up to 5 mm long and 3.5 mm wide at the base; filaments c. 2 mm long, anthers basifixed, yellow, about 1 cm long, style slightly overtopping the anthers at anthesis; ovary inferior, ovoid, 0.7 - 1.5 - 0.4 - 0.5 cm, stigma minute
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Pedicel
Pedicels 1- 2.5 cm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Capsule 3.5 - 4 x 1 - 1.5 cm, carrying the persistent perianth tube apically
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences Scape
Scape lateral, 18 - 20 cm long, glabrous, 1 - 2 to a bulb, inflorescence (1 -)2 - 3-flowered, subtended by a membranaceous bract 3 - 6 x c. 1.5 cm wide at the base, sometimes with an apical split. Pedicels 1- 2.5 cm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds
Seeds black, globose, 0.4 - 0.5 cm in diameter.
Note
The short tube indicates that Pancratium centrale is pollinated by insects other than large hawk-moths, which are supposed to pollinate the other Pancratium species, all of which have tubes longer than 9 cm. The border area between Ethiopia and the Sudan around Assosa, appears to be not only a centre of survival of disjunct relic species, such as Pancratium centrale and Zygotritonia praecox, but may also represent an "evolutionary hotspot". Endemic or near-endemic monocots in this region include species of Crinum (Amaryllidaceae, Nordal & Sebsebe 2002), Drimiopsis (Hyacinthaceae), Chlorophytum (Anthericaceae), and Aloe (Asphodelaceae). In addition near-endemic dicot species of Combretum (Combretaceae), Vernonia, Bidens, and Laggera (Asteraceae) have been recorded. A more detailed presentation of the biodiversity and endemicity of the region is given in Sebsebe Demissew et al. (2004). Ethiopian evolutionary hot spots of monocot geophytes are also discussed in Nordal et al. (2001).
Type
Chari Oriental (Pays de Snoussi), pays Ndouka et Télé, 2- 12/5 1903, Chevalier 8350 (P!, lectotype, selected here, K!, P!, isolectotype).
Vegetative Multiplication Bulbs
Bulb globose, 4 - 6 cm in diameter, with a cylindrical neck 5 - 10 cm long

Native to:

Cameroon, Central African Repu, Chad, Ethiopia, Sudan

Pancratium centrale (A.Chev.) Traub appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status Has image?
Jan 1, 1978 Chevalier, A. [8350], Cameroon K000366061 Yes
Jan 1, 1978 Chevalier, A. [8370], Cameroon K000366060 Yes

First published in Pl. Life 19: 59 (1963)

Accepted by

  • Darbyshire, I., Kordofani, M., Farag, I., Candiga, R. & Pickering, H. (eds.) (2015). The Plants of Sudan and South Sudan: 1-400. Kew publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Demissew, S. & Nordal, I. (2004). Pancratium centrale (=Mizonia centralis) - a rare Central African species discovered in Ethiopia Kew Bulletin 59: 117-121.
  • Demissew, S. & Nordal, I. (2010). Aloes and other Lilies of Ethiopia and Eritrea, ed, 2: 1-351. Shama Books, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
  • Hedberg, I., Friis, I. & Persson, E. (2009). Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea 1: 1-305. The National Herbarium, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia & The Department of Systematic Botany, Upps.

Literature

Kew Bulletin

  • --- & --- (2002). Crinum bambusetum, a new species of Amaryllidaceae from North East Africa. Kew Bull. 57: 465 - 469.
  • --- (1917). Amaryllidaceae, in Novitates florae africanae. Plantes nouvelles de l'Afrique tropical francaise décrites d'apres les collections de M. Aug. Chevalier. Bull. Soc. Bot. France, sér. 4, XIV. Mém. 8e: 302 - 303.
  • --- (1935). Sur une Amaryllidée mal connu de l'Afrique Centrale. Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat. Paris Sér. 2, 7: 217-218.
  • --- (1950). Trois Amaryllidées cultivées en Afrique Tropicale par les Noirs. Rev. Bot. Appliq. 30: 626 - 629.
  • --- (1997). Amaryllidaceae. In: S. Edwards, Sebsebe Demissew & I. Hedberg (eds.), Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea Vol. 6: 157 - 163. Addis Ababa, Uppsala.
  • ---, ---, Herrmann, C, Friis, I., Tesfaye Awas & Stabbetorp, O. (2004). The Benshangul-Gumuz area - a new local centre of endemism in the border region between W. Ethiopia and E. Sudan. Biol. Skr.
  • ---, Sebsebe Demissew & Stabbetorp, O. (2001). Endemism in groups of Ethiopian geophytes ('Liliiflorae'). Biol. Skr. 54: 247 - 258.
  • Bjørnstad, I. N. (1973). A revision of the genus Pancratium L. (Amaryllidaceae) in Africa south of the Sahara. Norw. J. Bot. 20: 281 - 291.
  • Chevalier, A. (1913). Études sur la Flore de l'Afrique Centrale Francaise (Bassins de l'Oubangui et du Chari). Tome I. Énumération des plantes récoltées. A. Challemel, Paris.
  • Edwards, S., Sebsebe Demissew & Hedberg, I. (1997). Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea Vol. 6, Hydrocharitaceae to Arecaceae. Addis Ababa, Uppsala.
  • Friis, I. & Vollesen, K. (1999). Drimia sudanica, nom. nov. (Hyacinthaceae), a rare species of the Sudanian grasslands. Nordic J. Bot. 19: 209 - 212.
  • Menassie Gashaw, Michelsen, A., Friis, I., Jensen, M., Sebsebe Demissew & Zerihun Woldu 2002). Post- fire regeneration strategies and tree bark resistance to heating in frequently burning tropical savannah woodlands and grasslands in Ethiopia. Nordic J. Bot. 22: 19 - 33.
  • Nordal, I. (1987). Amaryllidacées. In: B. Satabié & P. Morat (eds.), Flore du Cameroun Vol. 30: 3-31. Ministere de l'Enseignement Superieur et de la Recherche Scientifique, Yaoundé, Cameroun.
  • Sebsebe Demissew, Nordal, I. & Stabbetorp, O. (2003). Aloes and other lilies of Ethiopia and Eritrea. Addis Ababa. Shamas Nature Series, Addis Ababa.
  • Traub, H. P. (1963). Notes on Amaryllidaceae. Plant Life 19: 59.
  • White, F. (1983). The vegetation of Africa. UNESCO, Paris.

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Darbyshire, I., Kordofani, M., Farag, I., Candiga, R. & Pickering, H. (eds.) (2015). The Plants of Sudan and South Sudan: 1-400. Kew publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Demissew, S. & Nordal, I. (2004). Pancratium centrale (=Mizonia centralis) - a rare Central African species discovered in Ethiopia Kew Bulletin 59: 117-121.

  • Herbarium Catalogue Specimens

    Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

  • Kew Backbone Distributions

    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2022. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

  • Kew Bulletin

    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

  • Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone

    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2022. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0