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This species is accepted, and its native range is Coasts of Dry Tropical Africa to KwaZulu-Natal, Indian Subcontinent, Vietnam, Jawa to N. Australia.
Tecticornia indica

[FTEA]

Chenopodiaceae, J. P. M. Brenan. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1954

Morphology General Habit
Main stems prostrate, up to at least 40 cm. long, reaching several feet and forming loose open mats in age, with profuse, lateral, ascending or erect, fertile or sterile branches about 15–30 cm. high.
Morphology Branches
Sterile segments (see above) mostly about 5–11 mm. long and 3–6 mm. in diameter, when mature their sides often convex in outline.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Male flowers unknown. Female flowering spikes mostly about 1–4 cm. long and 4–5 mm. in diameter, the flowers (except stigmas) hidden.
sex Male
Male flowers unknown.
sex Female
Female flowering spikes mostly about 1–4 cm. long and 4–5 mm. in diameter, the flowers (except stigmas) hidden.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits Infructescences
Fruiting spikes cylindrical or somewhat thickened in middle, obtuse at apex, about 5–7 mm. in diameter, built up of numerous closely imbricate ring-like thickened fertile segments, their margins 1.5–3 (–4) mm. apart vertically, completely hiding the fruits; spikes finally disarticulating.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruiting calyces spongy, thickened, more or less obtriangular, obliquely truncate at apex, about 3 mm. long and 2 mm. wide and deep, adherent to the horny pericarp.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds
Seed about 1 mm. long and 0.8 mm. wide; testa pale brown, thin and rather soft.
Figures
Fig. 5.
Habitat
Saltbush on the drier landward sides of mangrove forest, covered by high seasonal tides, often associated with the grass Sporobolus virginicus
Distribution
Somalia, Portuguese East Africa and coast of India from Bombay to Bengal, including CeylonAngola and Senegal records very doubtfulwrongly recorded, through confusion with allied species, from the East Indies and Australia K7 T3 T6 Z

[FSOM]

M. Thulin et al. Flora of Somalia, Vol. 1-4 [updated 2008] https://plants.jstor.org/collection/FLOS

Morphology General
Main stems prostrate, eventually forming loose open mats of considerable extent; lateral branches ascending or erect, to 30 cm high
Morphology Stem
Internodes ± clavate, 5–11 x 3–6 mm, free leaf-tips forming shallow 2-toothed cup
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Female flowering spikes 10–40 x 4–5 mm, flowers hidden except for stigmas
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits Infructescences
Fruiting perianth spongy, ± obtriangular, c. 3 x 2 mm, tip obliquely truncate, adhering to horny pericarp Fruiting spike cylindrical to slightly fusiform, tip rounded, 5–7 mm wide, internodes 1.5–3(–4) mm long, completely hiding fruits, eventually disarticulating
Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds
Seed c. 1 x 0.8 mm, testa pale brown, thin and rather soft.
Distribution
S2, 3 eastern coast of Africa south to Mozambique, coast of India from Bombay to Bengal, Sri Lanka.
Ecology
Near sea level.

[FZ]

Chenopodiaceae, J. P. M. Brenan. Flora Zambesiaca 9:1. 1988

Morphology General Habit
Main stems prostrate, up to at least 40 cm. long, becoming longer when older and forming loose open mats; lateral branches numerous ascending or erect, about 10–30 cm. high, fertile or sterile.
Morphology Stem
Sterile segments about 5–11 mm. long and 3–6 mm. in diam.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Flowering spikes about 1–4 cm. long and 4–5 mm. in diam., with the flowers (except for the stigmas) hidden.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers deeply embedded in and fused to the segment of the spike above each cluster.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Anthers very rarely visible, but sometimes a single often apparently non-functional stamen occurs with the ovary.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits Infructescences
Fruiting spikes cylindrical or somewhat thicker in middle, built up of numerous closely imbricate, ring-like, thickened and corky fertile segments, their margins 1.5–4 mm. apart, completely hiding the fruits; the segments finally disarticulating and falling away, leaving often a projecting bristle-like axis.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruiting calyces spongy and thickened, about 3×2 mm.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds
Seeds smooth.

Native to:

Angola, Bangladesh, India, Jawa, Kenya, KwaZulu-Natal, Lesser Sunda Is., Mauritania, Mozambique, Mozambique Channel I, New South Wales, Northern Territory, Pakistan, Queensland, Senegal, Somalia, South Australia, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Victoria, Vietnam, Western Australia

Tecticornia indica (Willd.) K.A.Sheph. & Paul G.Wilson appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
s.coll. [6942], India K000899807
Bogdan, A. [4709], Kenya Arthrocnemum indicum 21937.000
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6942] Salicornia indica K001126309
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6942] Salicornia indica K001126308
s.coll. [Cat. no. 6942] Salicornia indica K001126310

First published in Austral. Syst. Bot. 20: 327 (2007)

Accepted by

  • Govaerts, R., Nic Lughadha, E., Black, N., Turner, R. & Paton, A. (2021). The World Checklist of Vascular Plants, a continuously updated resource for exploring global plant diversity. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-021-00997-6 Scientific Data 8: 215.

Literature

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • (1984). Flora of Australia 4: 1-354. Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra.
  • Barry, J. P. & Celles, J.S. (1991). Flore de Mauritanie 1: 1-359. Centre Regional de Documentation Pedagogique, Nice.
  • Brenan, J.P.M. (1954). Flora of Tropical East Africa, Chenopodiaceae: 1-26.
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (2014-continuously updated). Atlas of Living Australia http://www.ala.org.au/.
  • Figueiredo, E. & Smith, G.F. (2008). Plants of Angola Strelitzia 22: 1-279. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.
  • Germishuizen, G. & Meyer, N.L. (eds.) (2003). Plants of Southern Africa an annotated checklist Strelitzia 14: 1-1231. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.
  • Hedge, I.C., Akhani, H., Freitag, H., Kothe-Heinrich, G., Podlech, D., Rilke, S. & Uotila, P. (1997). Flora Iranica 172: 1-371. Naturhistorisches Museums Wien.
  • Hutchinson, J., Dalziel, J.M. & Keay, R.W.J. (1954-1958). Flora of West Tropical Africa, ed. 2, 1: 1-828.
  • Lê, T.C. (2003). Danh l?c các loài th?c v?t Vi?t Nam 2: 1-1203. Hà N?i : Nhà xu?t b?n Nông nghi?p.
  • Mostaph, M.K. & Uddin, S.B. (2013). Dictionary of plant names of Bangladesh, Vasc. Pl.: 1-434. Janokalyan Prokashani, Chittagong, Bangladesh.
  • Thulin, M. (ed.) (1993). Flora of Somalia 1: 1-493. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Van Steenis, C.G.G.J. (ed.) (1948-1954). Flora Malesiana 4: 1-631. Noordhoff-Kolff N.V., Djakarta.

Art and Illustrations in Digifolia
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew

Flora Zambesiaca
Flora Zambesiaca
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Flora of Somalia
Flora of Somalia
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Flora of Tropical East Africa
Flora of Tropical East Africa
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Science Photographs
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/