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This species is accepted, and its native range is S. Tropical Africa (Chimanimani Mountains).

[KBu]

Demissew, S. (2008). Four new species of Asparagus (Asparagaceae) from the Flora Zambesiaca area. Kew Bulletin 63: 269. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-008-9017-y

Conservation
Data Deficient. Known only from the Chimanimani Mts and an area (not specified in Manica E Sofala in Mozambique. There are only three collections of this unique Asparagus species. More collections and field observations are required.
Distribution
Known so far only from the Chimanimani Mts in Zimbabwe and an unspecified area in Manica or Sofala in Mozambique.
Ecology
Banks of river near falls, growing amongst rocks; c. 2100 m (in Zimbabwe).
Morphology General Habit
Erect shrub 40 – 50 cm high
Morphology General Spines
Spines on main stems and below branchlets, 2 – 5 mm long, curved downwards Spinules below flowers absent
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers solitary or in fascicles of 2 – 4; pedicel (below articulation, 2 – 3 mm long), pedicel size not clear (because the part above the articulation had fallen off)
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Tepal
Tepals caducous and hence not seen
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Berry 7 – 9 mm in diam.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescence simple or compound racemes, 2 – 4.5 cm long; bracts ovate c. 1.5 mm long
Morphology Stem
Stem and branchlets with regular zigzag branching, branchlets ribbed, glabrous
Morphology Stem Cladodes
Cladodes solitary or in fascicles of 2 – 4 together, stellately arranged on a zigzagging branchlet, 5 – 10 × 1 mm, attenuate at the base, acute at the apex
Note
Asparagus chimanimanensis refers to “the asparagus of Chimanimani Mts”, named after the mountain, where the type specimen was collected. Asparagus chimanimanensis resembles A. rigidus Jessop from South Africa (Mpumalanga) on account of the ribbed branches and stellately arranged cladodes. However, it has a long racemose inflorescence, 2 – 4.5 cm long, a peduncle 4 – 5 mm long, and branches conically in outline, resembling a Christmas tree. In contrast, A. rigidus has flowers on a short peduncle c. 2 mm long, the peduncle including the flower is less than 1 cm long, and branching is cylindrical-fusiform like a ‘fox-tail’ in outline.
Type
Zimbabwe, E, Melsetter Distr., Chimanimani Mts, Chikukwa’s Kraal, banks of river near falls, fr. 16 Nov. 1967, Mavi 653 (holotypus K; isotypi LISC, SRGH).

[FZ]

Flora Zambesiaca Asparagaceae by Sebsebe Demissew

Morphology General Habit
Erect shrub 40–50 cm high.
Morphology Stem
Stem and branchlets with regular branching, ribbed, glabrous.
Morphology General Spines
Spines on main stems and below branchlets, 2–5 mm long, curved downwards. Spinules below flowers absent.
Morphology Stem Cladodes
Cladodes solitary or in fascicles of 2–4 together, stellately arranged on a zigzag branchlet, 5–10 × 1 mm, acute at apex, attenuate at base.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescence simple or compound, 20–45 mm long; bracts ovate, c.1.5 mm long.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers solitary or in fascicles of 2–4; pedicel articulation not clear (missing above, 2–3 mm long below).
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Tepal
Tepals caducous, not seen.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Berry 7–9 mm in diameter.
Distribution
Not known elsewhere. .
Ecology
Growing amongst rocks; c.2100 m.
Conservation
Conservation notes: Endemic to the Chimanimani Mts; Lower Risk near threatened.

Native to:

Mozambique, Zimbabwe

Asparagus chimanimanensis Sebsebe appears in other Kew resources:

First published in Kew Bull. 63: 271 (2008)

Accepted by

  • Timberlake, J.R. & Martins, E.S. (eds.) (2008). Flora Zambesiaca 13(1): 1-140. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Literature

Kew Bulletin

  • IUCN (2001). IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria: Version 3.1. Prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.
  • Jessop, J. P. (1966). The genus Asparagus in Southern Africa. Bothalia 9 1: 31 – 96.
  • Malcomber, S. T. & Sebsebe, D. (1993). The status of Protasparagaus and Myrsiphyllum in the Asparagaceae. Kew Bull. 48: 63 – 78.
  • Obermeyer, A. A. & Immelman, K. L. (1992). Protasparagus. In: O. A. Leistner (ed.), Flora of Southern Africa Vol. 5 (3): 71 – 82. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.
  • Sebsebe Demissew (1995). Asparagaceae. In: M. Thulin (ed.), Flora of Somalia Vol. 4: 24 – 27. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • ____ (1996). Asparagaceae. In: S. Edwards, Sebsebe Demissew & I. Hedberg (eds.), Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea Vol. 6: 67 – 73. National Herbarium, Addis Ababa and Department of Systematic Botany, University of Uppsala, Uppsala.
  • ____ (2006). Asparagaceae. In: H. Beentje & S. Ghazanfar (eds.), Flora of Tropical East Africa: 1 – 22. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Flora Zambesiaca

  • in Kew Bull. 63: 271 (2008).

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Timberlake, J.R. & Martins, E.S. (eds.) (2008). Flora Zambesiaca 13(1): 1-140. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Flora Zambesiaca
Flora Zambesiaca
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Bulletin
Kew Bulletin
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0