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This species is accepted, and its native range is S. Mozambique to Eswatini (Umbeluzi Gorge).

[FZ]

Flora Zambesiaca Asparagaceae by Sebsebe Demissew

Morphology General Habit
Rhizomatous shrub to 3 m high.
Morphology Stem
Stems and branches grey, glabrous and terete.
Morphology Stem Cladodes
Cladodes arranged in radiating fashion, 6–14 in a fascicle, flattened, 8–13 × 2 mm, obovate, narrowed at base, acute at apex. Epidermis with clear reticulation.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescence racemose, branching and rebranching, 50–80 mm long.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers 2–4 at each node; pedicels c.2.5 mm long, articulated at base.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Tepal
Tepals white, elliptic c.3 × 1 mm.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruits 7–8 mm in diameter.
Distribution
Also in Swaziland (Umbeluzi Gorge). .
Ecology
Dry rocky slopes of rhyolite with Androstachys johnsonii; c.100 m.
Conservation
Conservation notes: Only known from the above collections from the Lebombo Mtns on the Mozambique–Swaziland border; probably Vulnerable.

[KBu]

Demissew, S. (2008). Four new species of Asparagus (Asparagaceae) from the Flora Zambesiaca area. Kew Bulletin 63: 269. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-008-9017-y

Conservation
Data Deficient. This species is known from the well collected region near Maputo (but only the two collections are seen in herbaria) and a single collection from Umbeluzi Gorge in Swaziland made recently. There is a need to carry out collecting and field observations in the area around Goba in Mozambique and in Umbeluzi Gorge in Swaziland.
Distribution
Known only from the Goba Distr. near Maputo in Mozambique and in Umbeluzi Gorge in Swaziland.
Ecology
Dry rocky slopes on rhyolite, in Androstachys johnsonii dry forest; c. 110 m.
Morphology General Habit
Climbing shrub to 3 m high
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers 2 – 4 at each node
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Pedicel
Pedicels c. 2.5 mm long, articulated at the base
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Tepal
Tepals white, elliptic, c. 3 × 1 mm
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruits 7 – 8 mm in diam.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescences racemose, branching once or twice, 5 – 8 cm long
Morphology Stem
Stems and branches grey, glabrous and terete
Morphology Stem Cladodes
Cladodes radiating, 6 – 14 in a fascicle, flattened, 8 – 13 × c. 2 mm, obovate, narrowed at the base, acute at the apex; epidermis with clear reticulation
Note
Asparagus radiatus is related to A. aethiopicus, a South African species. It differs in that A. aethiopicus has branches and inflorescence parts angled/striate (not terete), pedicels 3.5 – 4 mm long (not c. 2.5 mm) and cladodes not radially arranged. It also resembles A. natalensis, which is widespread in Africa from South Africa to Ethiopia. However, as well as the radiating cladodes, the new species differs by the cladodes and inflorescences being on separate parts (not intermingled with each other as in A. natalensis). Asparagus radiatus, “the asparagus with radially arranged parts” refers to the verticillate (radial arrangment) of the cladodes, which is unique amongst the related species.
Type
Mozambique, M: Maputo (Lourenço Marques), Goba, 23 Nov. 1944, F. A. Mendonça 3081 (holotypus LISC).
Vegetative Multiplication Tubers
Tubers lateral, 20 – 38 × 10 – 24 mm

Native to:

Mozambique, Swaziland

Asparagus radiatus Sebsebe appears in other Kew resources:

First published in Kew Bull. 63: 275 (2008)

Accepted by

  • Timberlake, J.R. & Martins, E.S. (eds.) (2008). Flora Zambesiaca 13(1): 1-140. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Literature

Kew Bulletin

  • IUCN (2001). IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria: Version 3.1. Prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.
  • Jessop, J. P. (1966). The genus Asparagus in Southern Africa. Bothalia 9 1: 31 – 96.
  • Malcomber, S. T. & Sebsebe, D. (1993). The status of Protasparagaus and Myrsiphyllum in the Asparagaceae. Kew Bull. 48: 63 – 78.
  • Obermeyer, A. A. & Immelman, K. L. (1992). Protasparagus. In: O. A. Leistner (ed.), Flora of Southern Africa Vol. 5 (3): 71 – 82. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.
  • Sebsebe Demissew (1995). Asparagaceae. In: M. Thulin (ed.), Flora of Somalia Vol. 4: 24 – 27. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • ____ (1996). Asparagaceae. In: S. Edwards, Sebsebe Demissew & I. Hedberg (eds.), Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea Vol. 6: 67 – 73. National Herbarium, Addis Ababa and Department of Systematic Botany, University of Uppsala, Uppsala.
  • ____ (2006). Asparagaceae. In: H. Beentje & S. Ghazanfar (eds.), Flora of Tropical East Africa: 1 – 22. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Flora Zambesiaca

  • in Kew Bull. 63: 275 (2008).

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Timberlake, J.R. & Martins, E.S. (eds.) (2008). Flora Zambesiaca 13(1): 1-140. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Flora Zambesiaca
Flora Zambesiaca
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Bulletin
Kew Bulletin
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0