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This species is accepted, and its native range is Bolivia.
A specimen from Kew's Herbarium

[KBu]

Goyder, D.J. (2008). Philibertia (Apocynaceae: Asclepiadoideae) — additional notes and three new species for Bolivia. Kew Bulletin 63: 323. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-008-9020-3

Distribution
Known from just three collections in the central Bolivian inter-Andean dry valley system of the Río Grande. Two come from an area some 20 km S of Vallegrande and the third from the Sucre region.
Ecology
Open grassland subject to periodic burning, among areas of scrub derived from moist semi-deciduous Tucumán forest. Alt. 2700 – 3200 m.
Morphology General
Latex white
Morphology General Habit
Perennial herb with simple or branched erect stems to 20 cm from a thickened somewhat woody vertical rootstock
Morphology General Indumentum
Whole plant minutely pubescent with white hairs
Morphology Leaves
Leaves with petiole 1 – 2 cm long; lamina 1.5 – 3 × 1.5 – 2 cm, ovate, with an acute apex and a deeply cordate base
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens Anthers
Anther wings 1 mm long, broadly flared away from the column so the gynostegium appears broadly conical-Corpusculum c. 0.4 mm long, subcylindrical, brown; translator arms c. 0.2 mm long, broadly flattened; pollinia c. 0.5 mm long, flattened, elliptic. Stylar head appendage extending c. 3.5 mm beyond the anthers and 1.5 mm beyond the mouth of the corolla, narrowly cylindrical with an entire apex, not contorted, white
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Calyx lobes 3 × 2 mm, ovate, acute, pubescent with spreading white hairs
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Corolla with lobes ± valvate in bud; tube urceolate or subglobose, 4 – 5 mm in diameter, yellow-green, minutely pubescent outside, bearded with white hairs c. 1 mm long within; lobes 2 – 3 × 1 – 2 mm, suborbicular, minutely pubescent outside, glabrous within
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corona
Staminal corona lobes arising at the base of the column, c. 2 mm long, erect, slightly longer than the staminal column, dorsoventrally flattened but slightly fleshy at least along the mid-line, oblong, the apex distinctly bifid Basal coronal ring absent
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynostegium
Gynostegium sessile
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Follicles and seeds not seen
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescences extra-axillary, umbelliform, with 1 – 4 flowers; peduncle c. 2 cm long; bracts 2 – 3 mm long, filiform; pedicels 10 – 15 mm long
Note
As floral characters of Philibertia urceolata suggest some connection between Philibertia and Oxypetalum, it would be interesting to include this species in future molecular analyses of the Oxypetalinae. I have not calculated the extent of occurrence for this species, as most of the territory delimited would fall outside the species’ altitudinal range and other habitat requirements. Data Deficient. Although only known from three populations with a known area of occupancy of less than 10 km2 (using criterion B2a of the IUCN (2001) Red List categories and criteria), there is no evidence to suggest the habitat is under threat or that the populations are in decline. Indeed as the preferred habitat is open and somewhat disturbed, further populations may well be found in future. Philibertia urceolata is probably undercollected as it is inconspicuous and occurs in low population densities. Philibertia urceolata is perhaps most closely related to another erect species, P. suberecta Goyder, which occurs at higher altitude and over a much wider geographic area. It differs in several characters including the indumentum, which is shorter and more sparse in the new species rather than tomentose or even lanate in P. suberecta. The corolla tube is globose rather than campanulate in P. urceolata, and the corolla lobes much shorter and more rounded than the triangular lobes of the P. suberecta. The corona is absent in P. suberecta, whereas the new species has well-developed staminal corona lobes. These are not fused to the corolla tube as in the closely allied genus Oxypetalum but are otherwise reminiscent of that genus. Broad anther wings and a single stylar head appendage are encountered in several species of Philibertia, but in P. suberecta the anther wings are much shorter, and the stylar head appendages are paired, much longer and contorted. The first collection of this species seen by me (Wood & Goyder 15608) was too immature to determine with confidence at the time. But it is clearly conspecific with Wood & Mendoza 21464, from a locality only a few kilometres away, collected slightly later in the season. It also matches the single flower collected near Sucre and preserved in spirit (Wood 14288).
Type
Bolivia, Dept. Santa Cruz, Prov. Vallegrande: road between Guadelupe and Pucara, near summit of the highest hill, 2750 m, 25 Jan. 2005, Wood & Mendoza 21464 (holotypus K; isotypus LPB).

Native to:

Bolivia

Philibertia urceolata Goyder appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
Oct 6, 2008 Wood, J.R.I. [15608], Bolivia 62110.000
Jan 1, 2008 Wood, J.R.I. [14288], Bolivia 77728.000
Wood, J. R. I. [21464], Bolivia K000196716 holotype

First published in Kew Bull. 63: 325 (2008)

Accepted by

  • Jørgensen, P.M., Nee, M.H. & Beck., S.G. (eds.) (2013). Catálogo de las plantas vasculares de Bolivia Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 127: 1-1741. Missouri Botanical Garden.

Literature

Kew Bulletin

  • Goyder, D. J. (2004). An amplified concept of Philibertia Kunth (Apocynaceae: Asclepiadoideae), with a synopsis of the genus. Kew Bull. 59: 415 – 451.
  • IUCN (2001). IUCN Red List categories and criteria, version 3.1. IUCN Species Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, U.K.
  • Liede-Schumann, S., Rapini, A., Goyder, D. J. & Chase, M. (2005). Phylogenetics of the New World subtribes of Asclepiadeae (Apocynaceae – Asclepiadoideae): Metastelmatinae, Oxypetalinae and Gonolobinae. Syst. Bot. 30: 183 – 194.
  • Rapini, A., Chase, M. W. & Konno, T. U. P. (2006). Phylogenetics of South American Asclepiadoideae (Apocynaceae). Taxon 55: 119 – 124.
  • Wood, J. R. I. (2006). Inter-Andean dry valleys of Bolivia — floristic affinities and patterns of endemism: insights from Acanthaceae, Asclepiadaceae and Labiatae. In: R. T. Pennington, G. P. Lewis & J. A. Ratter (eds), Neotropical savannas and seasonally dry forests: plant diversity, biogeography and conservation, pp. 235 – 256. Systematics Association Special Volume 69, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida & London.

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Jørgensen, P.M., Nee, M.H. & Beck., S.G. (eds.) (2013). Catálogo de las plantas vasculares de Bolivia Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 127: 1-1741. Missouri Botanical Garden.

Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Bulletin
Kew Bulletin
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0