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This species is accepted, and its native range is NE. Nigeria to NW. Cameroon.

[KBu]

Cheek, M. & Etuge, M. 2009. Allophylus conraui (Sapindaceae) reassessed and Allophylus ujori described from Cameroon Highlands of West Africa. Kew Bulletin 64: 495. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-009-9139-x

Conservation
Conservation Status . As far as is known with data currently available, the stronghold of Allophylusujori was the Mambilla Plateau. “As an understorey tree to the stream-side Syzygium, this is probably one of the commonest stream bank trees on Mambilla” (J. D. Chapman 2670). However this is no longer the case since in the subsequent 35 years, streamside trees have been decimated on Mambilla (H. Chapman pers. comm. 2007). The current status of the species there needs assessment. At Njawa-Mayo Daga it occurs in “remnant riparian forest” (Tuley 2114) suggesting that it was formerly much more common. According to H. Chapman (pers. comm. 2007), it is likely still to survive at this locality. At Bali-Ngemba, a 10 km² remnant of forest in the Bamenda Highlands, where the species was first collected, it is not very common: only two specimens of the species are known out of many hundreds gathered in recent decades. Forest destruction here is recorded in Harvey et al. (2004) and looks set to continue. Even at Dom, where the species was recently discovered, only a single shrub was seen over about two weeks of botanical inventory, and this specimen (Cheek 13434) was made from limbs cut from the parent plant by recent path clearing operations. In conclusion A. ujori is here assessed as Endangered EN B2a,b(iii) according to IUCN (2001), being known from only four sites, all of which have seen loss of its forest habitat recently. This assessment duplicates the first assessment of this species (under the name A. conraui) in Cheek (2004). Assessed as EN B2ab(iii) in Cheek & Etuge (2009) and in Onana & Cheek (2011), which see for a detailed assessment. Not yet published on iucn.redlist.org. Highly threatened by the clearance for agriculture of the last few remaining patches of its submontane forest habitat from the Bamenda and Mambilla Highlands. Of the four known spiny species of Allophylus documented in this paper, this is likely to be the first to become extinct.
Distribution
Distribution . NE Nigeria and North West Province, Cameroon. NE Nigeria and NW region of Cameroon.
Ecology
Submontane evergreen forest, especially near streams; 1400 – 1600 m. Submontane evergreen forest, especially near streams; 1400 – 1800 m asl.
Morphology General Habit
Small evergreen multistemmed tree, or large shrub 5 – 10 m tall; older, leafless stems, more than 1 cm diam., armed with patent, simple woody spines 0.5 – 2 cm long, apparently derived from modified axillary shoots; bark dull grey-brown; leafy branches terete, 3 – 4 mm diam., epidermis dark brown, marked by lenticels; lenticels slightly raised, pale brown, longitudinally arranged, linear, 1 – 3 × c. 0.15 mm; indumentum moderately dense, hairs patent, greyish or yellowish white, 1 – 2 mm long
Morphology Leaves
Leaves coriaceous, drying blackish brown above, greenish brown below, with three subsequent sessile leaflets, lateral leaflets elliptic 7.5 – 13.2 × 3.5 – 6.2 cm, apex broadly acute or with a broad acumen c. 0.5 – 1 cm long, base obtuse to broadly acute, margin inconspicuously serrate in distal half to third, (0.6 –) 0.8 – 1 teeth per cm, c. 10 teeth per side, teeth 0.5 – 1 mm deep and wide, apiculate; secondary nerves (7 –) 8 – 9 (– 10) per side, tertiary and quaternary nerves conspicuous below, domatia absent, upper surface with midrib densely puberulent, otherwise glabrous or sparsely hairy, hairs simple, 0.5 – 1 mm long, patent, lower surface softly hairy with wefts of interlocking hairs, to subglabrous; petiole of central leaflet 5 – 7 mm long, of lateral leaflets 3 – 5 mm long, densely puberulent; petiole 5 – 8 (– 10.5) cm long, densely hairy, hairs erect, c. 1 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Female flowers unknown Male flowers: buds near anthesis 1.2 – 1.3 × c. 2 mm, flowers at anthesis yellow
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamens 8, asymmetrically inserted, c. 2 mm long, filaments 1.8 – 2 mm long, glabrous; anthers elliptic, c. 0.4 mm long, apex bifid, base cordate; pistillodesubglobose, apex apiculate, c. 0.25 × 0.25 mm, inconspicuous
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Outer sepals 2, elliptic, strongly concave, 1.1 – 1.2 × c. 0.9 × 0.5 mm, outer and inner surfaces glabrous, margin with scattered, simple, patent hairs 0.1 mm long Inner sepals 2, transversely elliptic, concave, 1.2 – 1.3 × c. 1.7 × 0.3 – 0.5 mm, indumentum as outer sepals. Petals 4, obovate, 0.9 – 1 × 0.7 – 0.8 mm, apex shortly acuminate, base cuneate, abaxial surface glabrous, adaxial surface with a deeply bifid ligule, the lobes each c. 0.25 × 0.25 mm, long-hairy, the hairs 0.25 – 0.5 mm long, otherwise glabrous. Disc lobes 4, asymmetrically inserted, triangular, 0.5 – 0.8 × 0.3 – 0.4 mm, apex rounded and recurved, upper surface convex; glabrous
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Immature fruit green, subglobose, c. 0.8 × 0.5 – 0.7 cm, single-seeded
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescence axillary, branched, single, 3 or 4 per leafy branch, 7 – 9 (– 14) cm long, indumentum as petiole; peduncle 3.3 – 6.5 cm long, primary branches (2 –) 4 (– 6), each (0.5 –) 1 – 3 cm long, patent; bracts linear-triangular, 1 – 2 mm long, densely hairy, partial-peduncles 0.3 – 0.5 cm long, rhachis largely concealed by 10 – 20 cymules; cymules 2 – 3-flowered, 2 – 3 mm long, sessile, bracteoles ovate-triangular, c. 0.3 mm long, margins hairy, pedicels c. 1.3 mm long, articulated at base, sparsely hairy, hairs patent, 0.1 – 0.2 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds
Seed ellipsoid, c. 2.3 × 2.3 mm (immature)
Note
Distinguished from all other spiny species of Allophylus by having long (>1 mm long) white indumentum on leaves and stems (not glabrous or with hairs brown, <0.2 mm long). Allophylusconrauisensu Cheek (2004: 124, 169) non Radlk. Etymology . Named for Edwin Ujor of the Forestry Service Nigeria, who collected the first specimen of the species in the Bali Ngemba Forest Reserve, Cameroon. Named for Edwin Ujor, Nigerian forester, who collected the first known specimen of the species.
Type
Type: Nigeria, NE State, Mambilla Plateau, Gembu, fl. 12 Feb. 1972, Chapman 2670 (holotype K!; isotypes FHI, FHO). Typus: Nigeria, NE State, Mambilla Plateau, Gembu, fl. 12 Feb. 1972, Chapman 2670 (holotypusK!; isotypi FHI , FHO).

[KBu]
Use
None are known.

Native to:

Cameroon, Nigeria

Allophylus ujori Cheek appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
Nov 1, 2008 Pollard, B.J. [1380], Cameroon K000580435
Jan 1, 2007 Cheek, M. [13434], Cameroon K000437913
Jan 1, 2007 Ujor, E.U. [FHI 30334], Cameroon K000093179
Jan 1, 2007 Ujor, E.U. [FHI 30334], Cameroon K000093180
Dec 1, 2003 Cheek, M. [10432], Cameroon K000746436

First published in Kew Bull. 64: 499 (2009)

Accepted by

  • Govaerts, R., Nic Lughadha, E., Black, N., Turner, R. & Paton, A. (2021). The World Checklist of Vascular Plants, a continuously updated resource for exploring global plant diversity. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-021-00997-6 Scientific Data 8: 215.

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Herbarium Catalogue Specimens

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

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Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0