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This species is accepted, and its native range is Central & S. Tanzania, Caprivi Strip.
A specimen from Kew's Herbarium

[KBu]

Darbyshire, I., Tripp, E.A. & Chase, F.M. (2019). A taxonomic revision of Acanthaceae tribe Barlerieae in Angola and Namibia. Part 1. Kew Bulletin 74: 5. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-018-9791-0

Conservation
This species is assessed as Endangered — EN B2ab(iii) on the IUCN Red List (Luke et al. 2015). It has only been found once in Namibia and in view of the high levels of disturbance along the Okavango River, it must be considered highly threatened there and there is an urgent need to assess its current status in Namibia. Assessed by Darbyshire (2010) as IUCN (2001) category Data Deficient (DD); the discovery of a Namibian population greatly extends the Extent of Occurrence but this species remains poorly known and is still clearly scarce. As threats remain unknown, the assessment of DD is upheld here.
Distribution
Northeastern Namibia (Kavango East Region); Tanzania. Central Tanzania, NE Namibia.
Ecology
In Namibia, Barleria pseudosomalia has been recorded from the shade of moist dense bushland on sandy soil, at c. 1000 m [elevation not recorded on specimen]. The single known locality is within the North-eastern Kalahari Woodland vegetation type of Mendelsohn et al. (2002). In Tanzania, it is recorded from dry woodland and scrub with Brachystegia microphylla Harms at 1200 – 1250 m elevation. In Tanzania, recorded from dry woodland and scrub with Brachystegiamicrophylla; 1200 – 1250 m alt. In Namibia, in shade of moist dense bushland on sandy soil; altitude unrecorded.
Morphology General Habit
Subshrub or prostrate perennial herb, to 50 cm tall; stems soon woody with pale grey or sandy-coloured bark, young stems with stiff appressed buff-yellow hairs and sometimes with scattered short retrorse hairs, soon glabrescent
Morphology Leaves
Leaves sessile or petiole to 6 mm long; blade (ovate-) elliptic to narrowly so, 5.5 – 10.5 × 1.9 – 3.8 cm (l:w ratio 2.6 – 2.9 (– 3.6):1), base long-attenuate, apex acuminate, surfaces with coarse appressed or ascending hairs along principal veins and margin and scattered above, sparse on mature leaves; lateral veins 4 – 6 pairs
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamens inserted 7.5 – 8 mm from base of corolla tube; filaments ± 22 – 24 mm long; anthers 3.5 – 4.5 mm long; lateral staminodes 2 – 2.5 mm long, pilose, antherodes 1 – 1.2 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Calyx scarious in fruit; anterior lobe broadly ovate, 16 – 23 mm long and wide, base (sub)cordate, margin entire, apex truncate or emarginate, margin ciliate with appressed or ascending hairs, elsewhere glabrous or principal veins with few hairs; posterior lobe 20.5 – 29 mm long, base rounded or shallowly cordate, apex attenuate; lateral lobes linear-lanceolate, 5.5 – 10 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Corolla 42 – 48 mm long, (pale) blue with white throat, sparsely glandular-pilose externally; tube 19 – 25 mm long, broadly funnel-shaped above attachment point of stamens, c. 12.5 – 14.5 mm wide at mouth; limb in “4+1” configuration, abaxial lobe offset by ± 9 – 11.5 mm, obovate, 19 – 22.5 × 12 – 14.5 mm, apex emarginate; lateral lobes obovate, 13.5 – 15 × 11 – 13 mm, apices emarginate; adaxial lobes as lateral pair but ± 9 mm wide
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Pistil
Pistil glabrous; stigma subcapitate, 0.5 – 0.7 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Capsule 2-seeded, 13 – 14.5 mm long, glabrous; seeds 7.5 – 8.5 × 7 – 8 mm.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescences axillary, flowers solitary; bracts foliaceous; bracteoles often caducous, linear or narrowly elliptic-lanceolate, 2.5 – 10 × 0.2 – 1.5 mm, ascending; pedicels 4 – 11 mm long
Note
The remarkable disjunction in the range of this species is discussed by Darbyshire et al. (2012: 765, Fig. 5); where this species is illustrated. With its large, conspicuous flowers it is unlikely to be overlooked and so is likely to be truly rare, but populations may be found in Zambia in the future.
Type
Tanzania, Mpwapwa Distr., 2 – 3 miles on Kibakwe to Motta track, fr. 10 April 1988, Bidgood, Mwasumbi & Vollesen 1001 (holotype K sheet 1! [K000779572]; isotypes C, CAS, DSM!, EA! [EA000003208], K sheet 2! [K000779571]). Type: Tanzania, Mpwapwa Distr., Bidgood et al. 1001 (holotype K! sheet 1; isotypes C, CAS, DSM!, EA!, K! sheet 2).

Native to:

Caprivi Strip, Tanzania

Barleria pseudosomalia I.Darbysh. appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
Aug 1, 2009 Bidgood, S. [1001], Tanzania K000779571 isotype
Aug 1, 2009 Bidgood, S. [1001], Tanzania K000779572 holotype

First published in Fl. Trop. E. Africa, Acanth.(2): 377 (2010)

Accepted by

  • Darbyshire, I., Tripp, E.A. & Chase, F.M. (2019). A taxonomic revision of Acanthaceae tribe Barlerieae in Angola and Namibia. Part 1 Kew Bulletin 74(5): 1-85. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Darbyshire, I., Vollesen, K. & Kelbessa, E. (2010). Flora of Tropical East Africa, Acanthaceae (Part 2): 287-756.

Literature

Kew Bulletin

  • Balkwill, M.-J. & Balkwill, K. (1997). Delimitation and infra-generic classification of Barleria (Acanthaceae). Kew Bull. 52: 535 − 573.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  • Balkwill, M.-J. & Balkwill, K. (1998). A preliminary analysis of distribution patterns in a large, pantropical genus, Barleria L. (Acanthaceae). J. Biogeogr. 25: 95 – 110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  • Clarke, C. B. (1899). Barleria. In: I. H. Burkill & C. B. Clarke (1899 − 1900), Acanthaceae, pp. 140 – 169. In: W. T. Thiselton-Dyer (ed.), Flora of Tropical Africa 5, pp. 1 – 262. L. Reeve & Co., London.
  • Craven, P. (1999). A Checklist of Namibian Plant Species. Southern African Botanical Diversity Network Report No. 7, Pretoria, South Africa.
  • Craven, P. (ed.) (1999). A checklist of Namibian plant species. South African Botanical Diversity Network Report No. 7, SABONET, Windhoek.
  • Darbyshire (2010: 377)
  • Darbyshire, I. (2009). A reassessment of the status of Barleria sect. Cavirostrata (Acanthaceae) in tropical Africa, with a new species, B. richardsiae, described from the Tanzania-Zambia border region. Kew Bull. 63: 601 − 611.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  • Darbyshire, I. (2010). Barleria. In H. Beentje (ed.) Flora of Tropical East Africa. Acanthaceae (Part 2): 325 – 442. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Darbyshire, I. (2010b). Barleria. In: H. J. Beentje (ed.), Flora of Tropical East Africa. Acanthaceae, pp. 325 – 442. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Darbyshire, I., Tripp, E. A. & Dexter, K. G. (2012). A new species and a revised record in Namibian Barleria (Acanthaceae). Kew Bull. 67: 759 – 766.
  • IUCN (2001). IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. Version 3.1. IUCN Species Survival Commission, IUCN, Gland and Cambridge.
  • Klaassen, E. & Kwembeya, E. (eds) (2013). A checklist of Namibian indigenous and naturalised plants. Occasional Contributions No. 5, National Botanical Research Institute, Windhoek.
  • Luke, Q., Bangirinama, F., Beentje, H. J., Darbyshire, I., Gereau, R., Kabuye, C., Kalema, J., Kelbessa, E., Kindeketa, W., Minani, V., Mwangoka, M. & Ndangalasi, H. (2015). Barleria pseudosomalia. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2015.2. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 16 July 2015.
  • Makholela, T. (2008). Acanthaceae. In: E. Figueiredo & G. F. Smith (eds), Plants of Angola/Plantas de Angola. Strelitzia 22: 21 − 25.
  • McDade, L. A., Daniel, T. F. & Kiel, C. A. (2008). Toward a comprehensive understanding of phylogentic relationships among lineages of Acanthaceaes.l. (Lamiales). Amer. J. Bot. 95: 1136 – 1152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  • Mendelsohn, J., Jarvis, A., Roberts, C. & Robertson, T. (2002). Atlas of Namibia. A portrait of the land and its people. Ministry of Environment & Tourism and David Philip, Cape Town.
  • Meyer, P. G. (1968). 130. Acanthaceae. In H. Merxmüller (ed.), Prodromus einer Flora von Südwestafrika. J. Cramer, Germany.
  • Meyer, P. G. (1968). 130. Acanthaceae. In: H. Merxmüller (ed.) Prodromuseiner Flora von Südwestafrika. J. Cramer, Lehre.
  • Thulin, M. (1994). Aspects of disjunct distributions and endemism in the arid parts of the Horn of Africa, particularly Somalia. In: J. H. Seyani & A. C. Chikuni (eds), Proceedings of the XIIIth plenary meeting of AETFAT, Zomba, Malawi, 2 − 11 April 1991, Vol. 2: 1105 − 1119. National Herbarium and Botanic Gardens of Malawi.
  • Verdcourt, B. (1969). The arid corridor between the north-east and south-west areas of Africa. In: E. M. van Zinderen Bakker (ed.), Palaeoecology of Africa and of the surrounding islands and Antarctica 4: 140 − 144 . A. A. Balkema, Cape Town.
  • Winter, B. de (1971). Floristic relationship between the northern and southern arid areas in Africa. Mitt. Bot. Staatssamml. München 10: 424 − 437.

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Darbyshire, I., Vollesen, K. & Kelbessa, E. (2010). Flora of Tropical East Africa, Acanthaceae (Part 2): 287-756.

Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Bulletin
Kew Bulletin
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0