Orthosiphon aristatus var. aristatus

This variety is accepted
The native range of this variety is Tropical & Subtropical Asia to N. Australia. It is a subshrub or shrub and grows primarily in the wet tropical biome.

Descriptions

Suddee, S., A. J. Paton, & Parnell, J. (2005). Taxonomic Revision of Tribe Ocimeae Dumort. (Lamiaceae) in Continental South East Asia III. Ociminae. Kew Bulletin, 60(1), 3-75. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/4110885

Type
Indonesia, Java, Thunberg s.n. [holotype S (microfiche IDC 1036 no. 14597!)].
Morphology Stem
Stems branched
Morphology Leaves
Leaves petiolate, ovate or ovate- lanceolate, 25 - 120 x 15 - 60 mm, apex acute or acuminate, base cuneate; petioles 5 - 30 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences Bracts
Bracts mostly persistent, ovate to broadly ovate, up to 5 mm long, apex acute, acuminate or cuspidate
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Calyx 4- 8 mm long at anthesis, 6- 15 mm long in fruit
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Corolla purple, 12 - 35 mm long; tube 10 - 20 mm long
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Nutlets oblong or ellipsoid, 1.5 - 2 mm long, reticulate.
Ecology
In various forest types, waste areas by roadside, edges of forests, often cultivated; from sea level - 1600 m.
Phenology
Flowering and fruiting all year round.
Distribution
Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam.
Vernacular
Burmese: Kant gyok. Cambodian: Kapen Prey, Mo Ni Mer Cla. Laotian: Ya Kwang, Nouat Meo. Thai: Yaa Nuad Maew (Central & Northern), Nuad Maew Tua Mia (Loei), Chatra Phra Inn (Central), Bang Rak Paa (Prachuap Khiri Khan). Vietnamese: Hobau Kodreng Koweng, Cay E Muoi, Cay E Nui, Nao, Rau Meo.
Note
The name Orthosiphon spiralis (Lour.) Merr. has been used by some botanists (Merrill 1925, 1935; Murata 1971). The identity of Trichostema spirale Lour. (1790) is still unknown as the type has yet to be found; there is no specimen in either P or BM. Loureiro's description is insufficient for identification as it could fit several genera of Lamiaceae; a proposal to reject the name Trichostema spirale has been submitted (Suddee & Paton 2004). After the doubtful Trichostema spirale, Clerodendrum spicatum Thunb. (1825) is the earliest available name. However, there was a prior use of Orthosiphon spicatus Benth. (1848). Ocimum aristatum Blume (1826) is the earliest name available and Orthosiphon aristatus (Blume) Miq. (1858) is therefore the correct name for the species.
[KBu]

Uses

Use
The species has long been cultivated in SE Asia as an ornamental plant and for medicinal purposes. In Thailand the leaves are pounded up, warmed over a fire while wrapped in bamboo leaves, and put on bruised or sprained ankles (Anderson 5644: PCMU). The root or the whole plant is used for decoction in northern Thailand (Bjornland, Brun & Schumacher 10: C; Brun & Schumacher 524: C). The leaves are used for kidney disease and urinary tract problems (Nanakorn, Hans & Beck 88-164: NY). This species is also cultivated as an ornamental pot plant in most parts of Thailand.
[KBu]

Sources

  • Herbarium Catalogue Specimens

    • Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
  • Kew Backbone Distributions

    • The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants 2024. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and https://powo.science.kew.org/
    • © Copyright 2023 World Checklist of Vascular Plants. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
  • Kew Bulletin

    • Kew Bulletin
    • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
  • Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone

    • The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants 2024. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and https://powo.science.kew.org/
    • © Copyright 2023 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0