Coleus strobilifer (Roxb.) A.J.Paton

First published in PhytoKeys 129: 100 (2019)
This species is accepted
The native range of this species is Indian Subcontinent to Thailand. It is an annual and grows primarily in the seasonally dry tropical biome.

Descriptions

Extinction risk predictions for the world's flowering plants to support their conservation (2024). Bachman, S.P., Brown, M.J.M., Leão, T.C.C., Lughadha, E.N., Walker, B.E. https://nph.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/nph.19592

Conservation
Predicted extinction risk: not threatened. Confidence: confident
[AERP]

Suddee, S., A. J. Paton, & Parnell, J. (2004). A Taxonomic Revision of Tribe Ocimeae Dumort. (Lamiaceae) in Continental South East Asia II. Plectranthinae. Kew Bulletin, 59(3), 379-414. doi:10.2307/4110950

Type
India, Koenig s.n., Linnean Herbarium 727.7 [lectotype LINN (microfiche!)].
Morphology General Habit
Erect or ascending annual or short lived perennial herbs up to 0.60 m tall Erect or ascending annual or short-lived perennial herbs, up to 0.80 m tall
Morphology Stem
Stems sometimes branching from rootstock, rounded, round-quadrangular or quadrangular, slightly branched above, pubescent with antrorse, retrorse or subpatent hairs, becoming denser on the inflorescence axis, with or without red sessile glands, old stem glabrous or glabrescent Stems pinkish-purple, rounded or round-quadrangular, pubescent
Morphology Leaves
Leaves opposite, often with axillary young leaves, ovate, broadly ovate, or orbicular, 15 - 105 x 10 - 60 mm, apex acute or obtuse, base cordate, truncate or shortly cuneate, margin crenate, dentate or serrate, never revolute, often fleshy, pubescent to densely pubescent above, tomentose beneath, red sessile glands prominent both sides, lateral veins 4 - 8; petiole distinct, 5 - 80 mm long, pubescent Leaves petiolate, opposite decussate, often with axillary young leaves, ovate, broadly ovate, or orbicular, 15 – 105 × 10 – 60 mm, apex acute or obtuse, base cordate, truncate or shortly cuneate, margin crenate, dentate or serrate, often fleshy, pubescent to densely pubescent above, tomentose beneath, red sessile glands prominent on both sides, lateral veins 4 – 8; petiole 5 – 80 mm long, pubescent
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescence simple or branched; spikes often tetragonal with rows of bracts in bud and becoming cylindric after anthesis, 8 - 55 x 8 - 10 mm, flowers dense; peduncle long and slender; bracts broadly ovate to lanceolate, up to 4 x 3 mm, apex acute or acuminate, base truncate with short claw, concave, abaxial pubescent with red sessile glands, adaxial glabrous with prominent nerves Inflorescence terminal and axillary, simple or branched; spike-like head often tetragonal with rows of bracts in bud and becoming cylindric after anthesis, 8 – 55 × 8 – 10 mm; bracts broadly ovate to lanceolate, pubescent, with red sessile glands
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Calyx tubular, 3 - 4 mm long at anthesis, pubescent outside; fruiting calyx bilabiate; posterior lip 1-lobed, ovate or ovate- lanceolate, up to 4.5 x 2.5 mm, deflexed and concealing throat, apex acute or acuminate, base constricted, ciliate or not, sparsely pubescent with dense or spare red sessile glands outside; anterior lip truncate or obscurely 4-toothed, membranous, usually adpressed on tube; tube up to 3 mm long, ventrally saccate around the middle, glabrescent to pubescent outside, glabrous with subprominent longitudinal nerves inside Calyx tubular, 3 – 4 mm long at anthesis, pubescent; fruiting calyx 5 – 7 mm long; posterior lip 1-lobed, ovate or ovate-lanceolate, deflexed and concealing throat, apex acute or acuminate, base constricted, ciliate or not, sparsely pubescent, with dense or spare red sessile glands; anterior lip truncate or obscurely 4-toothed, membranous, usually adpressed on tube; tube ventrally saccate around the middle, glabrescent to pubescent
Phenology
Flowering September - November, fruiting October - November.
Note
Anisochilus carnosus (L. f.) Wall. ex Benth. var. glabrior (Schrad.) Benth. (1848: 81); Hook. f. (1885: 627). Type: as for A. glaber. Anisochilus carnosus (L. f.) Wall. ex Benth. var. glabrus (Schrad.) Benth. (1835: 711), as ‘glabrum’. Type: as for A. glaber. Anisochilus carnosus (L. f.) Wall. ex Benth. var. purpurascens Benth. (1830b: 18, 1832: 60, 1848: 81); Hook. f. (1885: 627). Type: Burma, in monte Taong Dong Ava, 24 Nov. 1826, Wall. Cat. 2753A [K! (Herb. Benthamianum), lectotype chosen here; isolectotypes G-DC (microfiche!), K-W!]. Plectranthus dubius Spreng. (1825: 691), nom. illeg. Anisochilus glaber Schrad. (1833: 1, 1836: 69). Type: India, W Himalaya, to 2400 m, Edgworth 14 [neotype K! (Herb. Benthamianum), chosen by Suddee et al.2004]. Plectranthus strobiliferus Roxb. (1814: 45, 1832: 23). Type: Katu-Kurka, Illustration in Rheede, Hort. Malab. 10: 179, t. 90 (1690), (holotype illustration!). Lavandula carnosa L. f. (1781: 273). Type: as above. This species is very variable in leaf shape, calyx length and hairiness, but within the region it is easily distinguished by the ovate or ovate-lanceolate posterior fruiting calyx lip which conceals the throat. The type in the Linnean Herbarium is quite hairy. There are 3 sheets of Koenig s.n. in the type collection at C, but it is doubtful whether they are duplicates. Panigrahi & Murti (1981) argued that the name should be cited as Anisochilus carnosus (L. f.) Wall. (not Wall. ex Benth.) by saying that Wallich cited Lavandula carnosa under Anisochilus carnosus Wall. (as 'Anisochilos') in Wall. Cat. no. 2753, thus making the combination. Bentham, in Pl. Asiat. Rar Vol. 2 p. 18, published A. carnosum (Wall. MSS.), the name provided by Wallich, and also cited Lavandula carnosa under the name. According to Stafleu & Cowan (1976), Wall. Cat. no. 2604 - 4877 was published in 1831 and Bentham's work ( pp. 1 - 20) in 1830. The name should therefore be cited as A. carnosus (L. f.) Wall. ex Benth. Anisochilus carnosus (L. f.) Wall. ex Benth. var. villosior Benth. (1848: 81); Hook. f. (1885: 627). Type: Deccan Peninsula. Herb. Wight 2516 [K! (Herb. Benthamianum), lectotype chosen here]. Anisochilus carnosus (L. f.) Wall. ex Benth. var. eriocephalus (Benth.) S. R. Paul (1979: 45). Type: as for A. eriocephalus Benth. Anisochilus carnosus (L. f.) Wall. ex Benth. var. eriocephalus (Benth.) Cooke (1906: 450). Type: as for A. eriocephalus Benth. Anisochilus crassus Benth. (1848: 81). Type: Deccan Peninsula, Herb. Wight. 2517 [K! (Herb. Benthamianum), lectotype chosen here; isolectotypes E]. Anisochilus carnosus (L. f.) Wall. ex Benth. var. viridis Benth. (1848: 81); Hook. f. (1885: 627). Type: Deccan Peninsula, Herb. Wight 2521, [holotype K! (Herb. Benthamianum, with A. rupestris Wight MSS)]. Anisochilus decussatus Dalzell in Dalzell & Gibson (1861: 206). Type: India, Concan, on the Highest Ghauts opposite Bombay, Dalzell s.n. (holotype K!). Anisochilus eriocephalus Benth. (1848: 81); Hook. f. (1885: 627); Gamble (1924a: 1127); Mukerjee (1940: 58). Type: Deccan Peninsula, Bellary, Herb. Wight 2518 [K! (Herb. Benthamianum), lectotype chosen here; isolectotypes E, 2 sht. K! (Ex Herb. Wight Propr.)].
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Corolla pale purple, 8 – 12 mm long, glabrous or pubescent, with spare red sessile glands Corolla pale purple, 8 - 12 mm long; posterior lip shortly 4-lobed, erect, 2 median lobes orbicular, much larger than lateral, back of lobes sparsely villous with red sessile glands; anterior lip elliptic-oblong, concave, constricted at base, villous with red sessile glands outside, glabrous with similar glands inside, glands much denser at apex, edge thin and glabrescent; tube gradually dilated towards throat from around midpoint, base narrow and slender, glabrous or pubescent with sparse red sessile glands outside, hairs much denser at base, glabrous inside
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Nutlets dark brown to black, orbicular, 0.8 – 1 mm long Nutlets dark brown to black, orbicular, 0.8 - 1 mm long.
Distribution
Nepal, India (Deccan Peninsula, Sikkim, Assam), Sri Lanka, Burma, South China and Thailand. Himalaya, India, Sri Lanka, Burma, South China and Thailand.
Ecology
Open rocky places in deciduous forest, evergreen forest; 150 – 2400 m. Flowering September – January, fruiting October – March. In open places, deciduous forest, evergreen forest; 500 - 1050 m.
Conservation
Widespread, Least Concern.
Vernacular
Indian (Malayalam): Karpoora valli, Kurkka, Pattukurkka; (Marati) Kaapurli; (Tamil) Poochenthira pattai; (Telugu) Adusapundlaaku. Thai: Huu suea khao (Prachuap Khiri Khan Province). Thai: Huu suea khao (Prachuap Khiri Khan).
[KBu]

Sources

  • Angiosperm Extinction Risk Predictions v1

    • Angiosperm Threat Predictions
    • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
  • Herbarium Catalogue Specimens

    • Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
  • Kew Backbone Distributions

    • The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants 2024. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and https://powo.science.kew.org/
    • © Copyright 2023 World Checklist of Vascular Plants. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
  • Kew Bulletin

    • Kew Bulletin
    • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
  • Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone

    • The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants 2024. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and https://powo.science.kew.org/
    • © Copyright 2023 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
  • Kew Science Photographs

    • Copyright applied to individual images