Falcaria vulgaris Bernh.

First published in Syst. Verz. Erf.: 176 (1800)
This species is accepted
The native range of this species is S. Central Europe, Medit. to Central Asia. It is an annual or perennial and grows primarily in the temperate biome.

Descriptions

Ghazanfar, S. A. & Edmondson, J. R (Eds). (2014) Flora of Iraq, Volume 5 Part 2: Lythraceae to Campanulaceae.

Morphology General Habit
Glaucous perennial, 30–100 cm, branched from somewhat above the middle into a spreading compound inflorescence
Morphology Stem
Stem and branches wiry and tough, subterete, striate
Morphology Leaves
Radical leaves petiolate, biternate or ternate-pinnate, segments up to ± 30 × 2 cm, the segments long, linear-lanceolate or broadly linear, regularly sharply serrate with forward directed, long-acuminate, cartilaginous-margined teeth; upper leaves decreasing in size, pinnate or biternate to ternate, upper reduced and sessile; all leaves ± sheathing, glabrous or minutely puberulous on lower surface
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Partial umbels usually with 8–10 flowers, pedicels 2–12 mm, exceeding bracts of the involucel, which are similar in number and form to those of the involucre Umbels very numerous, (5–)8–10(–15)–radiate, rays 0.8–2.5(–3) cm; bracts of involucre 4–8, linear-subulate, much shorter than the rays
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers
Flowers ± 2.5 mm in diameter
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences Peduncles
Peduncles 2–4 cm
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Fruit linear-oblong, 3–4 × 0.75–1 mm, glabrous or somewhat puberulent when young
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Style
Styles slender, ± 1 mm, spreading or reflexed
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits Vittae
Vittae solitary in the valleculae, 2 on the commissure.
Ecology
Mountain slopes and valleys among Quercus forest, in fields and on waste land, in a Populus plantation; alt. 250–1650 m
Phenology
Flowering and fruiting: Jun.–Sep.
Distribution
Occasional in the forest zone of Iraq, less common in the moist-steppe zone. C Europe (France to Greece and W Russia), Turkey, Caucasus, Iran, C Asia (Kazakhstan, Siberia), Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, N Africa.
Note
ASYĀGH (Ir.-Arbil province, Radhi 3871 – “grazed by animals”); but Guest noted that it had been reported in Kut province as poisoning sheep, affecting their eyes and causing temporary blindness, being known there as ZAND AL-AL’ARŪS – a general name in Lower Iraq covering various white-flowered umbellifers. These two reports on the palatability of the plant are incompatible. It now seems probable that the plant on which Guest’s note was based had not been correctly determined since no specimen of F. vulgaris can now be traced from Lower Iraq, nor would this species of the mountains and foothills be likely to occur so far south as on the alluvial plain in Kut province. Nevertheless Radhi’s note requires confirmation before F. vulgaris may be assumed to be a wholesome forage plant.
[FIQ]

Sources

  • Flora of Iraq

    • http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0
  • Kew Backbone Distributions

    • The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants 2023. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and https://powo.science.kew.org/
    • © Copyright 2022 World Checklist of Vascular Plants. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
  • Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone

    • The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants 2023. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and https://powo.science.kew.org/
    • © Copyright 2022 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Vascular Plants. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
  • Kew Science Photographs

    • Copyright applied to individual images